Policies

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Able & Talented Policy

Introduction

This policy outlines the school’s developing practice and procedures relating to the support of more able and talented pupils.

 

The policy outlines the ways in which St Wilfrid's

 

  • Recognise that the able and talented 10-15% of pupils require appropriate differentiation.
  • Identifies such pupils in our school.
  • Will organise the education and teaching of able and talented children.
  • Identify teaching and learning strategies to support these pupils.
  • Enlist parental support.

 

Mission Statement

Education in our school should provide for all abilities.  Pupils deserve an education that encourages and motivates them to achieve their full potential.

 

The curriculum and organisation must allow each pupil to learn at a pace that is suitable for them.  Opportunities must be offered to enable the more able and talented pupils to develop fully their abilities within the context of the spiritual, moral, social and cultural framework in the school.

 

Who Are the Able and Talented Pupils?

Most teachers will agree that all pupils in our school have some special abilities and talents. The DfEE suggest that more able and talented pupils are defined as the top

10-15%.  These are pupils who have a broad spectrum of high ability when viewed against national norms and would benefit from an effective and planned differentiation programme.

 

Identification Strategies

Our children at St Wilfrid’s are unique and a child’s abilities may include the following:

 

  • Intellectual (linguistic, mathematical)
  • Creative (scientific, technical)
  • Artistic (art, music, drama)
  • Practical (technological, “hands on”)
  • Physical (sports, dance, movement)
  • Social (personal and interpersonal, leadership qualities)

 

We may find that a pupil will have a range of these abilities and also may be talented in a number of areas.  It is important to note here that those studying and researching the more able and talented pupils in schools have stipulated that it is important to recognise that to be able and talented does not just mean to be ‘intellectual’.

 

Howard Gardner, at Harvard University, has developed a theory of multiple intelligences that considers there to be seven distinct intelligences.

 

Linguistic

Can speak or write well, learns from reading, writing, listening, researching.

Musical

Able to sing, play, compose music, appreciate music, make up songs, raps, chants, keep rhythm.

Logical  Mathematical

Able to reason, calculate, logical, precise, enjoys mental problems.

Spatial

Able to draw, copy, paint, work with images, observant, coloursensitive.

Bodily  Kinaesthetic

Able to use hands well, good at physical activity, good dancer, actor, mimic.

Intrapersonal

Thinks a lot, aware of self, can ‘see’ situations clearly, self motivated, honest with self.

Interpersonal

Relates well with others, works well in teams, helps others, can manipulate others, popular, sensitive to others’ reactions.

 

St Wilfrid's wish to identify a wide range of gifts and talents, and we also wish our identification process to be rigorous and fair to all concerned, including the pupils, parents and the school.

 

It is expected that a child will be identified as able by their class teacher or in the case of extra curricular activities, by parent or other adult.  Evidence of particular skills may need to be confirmed by a subject specialist or advisor outside the school.

 

We use a range of information and professional assessment will be carried out through a combination of the following:

 

  • Analysis of information from previous schools.
  • Hard data such as standardised tests.
  • Assessment systems such as level descriptions.
  • Teacher assessments.
  • Observations of pupils working and scrutiny of work and collection of evidence.
  • Discussion with colleagues, including teaching assistants and TEALEEM.
  • Discussion with child.
  • Discussion with parent or guardian.
  • Ongoing assessment using open/differentiated tasks.
  • Careful record keeping.
  • Use of register of able and talented pupils.

 

The following statements may help staff at St Wilfrid's to identify their able and talented pupils:

 

  • Unusually high level of motivation and self expression.
  • The ability to see alternative solutions.
  • Specific intellectual/academic aptitude.
  • Shows unusual insights.
  • Is inquisitive/sceptical.
  • The ability to get to the essentials of the problem.
  • Original/imaginative/creative.
  • Outstanding ability in artistic, musical or physical aspects of the curriculum.
  • Exhibits unusually extroverted/introverted behaviour within a group.

 

The Role of the Able & Talented Co-ordinator.

Responsibilities include:

 

  • Monitoring early identification – pupils from other schools, new intake etc.
  • Arrangements for identification within the school.
  • That all staff involved with identified children know of their particular needs and are encouraged to make provision for them.
  • Updating colleagues on best practice or new initiatives as they arise.
  • The development of extension and enrichment material.
  • The monitoring of progress made of individual children.

 

Organisation

The pupils who have been identified by either staff or parents/guardians as being more able and talented are entered on to the school register.  A copy of this register is always made available to all members of staff.  The area of the ability is recorded with further reference made to any specific aspect that they have more abilities or talents in.

 

The parents/guardians are always consulted before a child’s name is put on to the register.  This will either take place through a meeting or if this is not possible a letter will be sent home.

 

The register is reviewed three times a year at a meeting of the staff concerned and the progress and targets set for each child is reviewed and evaluated.  If a pupil is not reaching their full potential, or has achieved its set targets then new arrangements or new targets will be set, where appropriate.

 

St Wilfrid's aim to create a culture in which children are encouraged to reach high standards.  To support this all pupils, including the able and talented pupils, are encouraged to join the after school science and physical education clubs and take advantage of the music teacher employed by the school.

 

Teaching and Learning – An Approach to Provision at Classroom Level

The classroom should offer a carefully structured positive atmosphere in which the contribution made by all staff is recognised, differences acknowledged and where enthusiasm for learning is fostered.  Teachers should seek to provide tasks that promote problem solving skills associated with clear thinking and a spirit of investigation should be encouraged.  Teachers should also demonstrate good questioning techniques.

 

An inventory of good practice within our school:

 

  • Full class teaching – in an atmosphere of mutual respect where mistake are accepted as a route to learning.
  • Grouping – by social groups, ability groups or mixed aptitude groups.
  • Withdrawal – to promote an atmosphere conductive to enquiry, to use specific resources or materials.
  • Mentoring – for social skill based needs.
  • Enrichment – visiting experts, range of materials and resources, study skills taught directly, investigation work, increased technical language etc.
  • Extension – open-ending tasks and questions, deepening understanding of concepts, additional activities based on the basic themes.
  • Differentiation – matching tasks and questioning to ability.
  • Challenge – introducing elements of competition with older pupils or wider arena from peer group.  Also competition against self is important – clear targeting.
  • Problem solving and investigation – to deepen reasoning and thinking skills.

 

The Role of Parents/Guardians

 

Parents and guardians involvement is encouraged in the child’s learning and the school aims to work in full partnership.  The pupil’s are encouraged to share their work and ideas with their parents/guardians during parents evening, visits to the school and at home.

 

Parents guardians are invited to support their child during the time they are completing set homework and they are encouraged to provide space for them to work and, if possible, additional resources such as reference material.

 

Pupils with Special Educational Needs and /or Disabilities

The school will:-

 

  • Promote equality of opportunity for disabled people: pupils, staff, parents, carers and other people who use the school or may wish to; and at St. Wilfrid's we aim to build on the distinctive Catholic ethos and success of our school, through our commitment to the Every Child Matters’ framework.

“Every pupil with additional needs in this inclusive school has an entitlement to fulfil his/ her optimum potential.

This is achieved by ensuring the well being of all pupils in relation to; being healthy, staying safe, enjoying and achieving, making a positive contribution, and achieving social and economic well-being”

 

At St. Wilfrid's we are committed to ensuring equality of opportunity for:

 

  • Pupils with disabilities in relation to education and associated services
  • Staff with disabilities in relation to employment rights, conditions and opportunities
  • All parents and members of the local community with disabilities in relation to additional services offered by, or at our school.

 

We aim to enable all pupils including those with Additional Educational Needs, Special Educational Needs and/ or disabilities, ethnic minorities to have access to a broad and balanced curriculum by making reasonable adjustments to ensure that no pupil is placed at a substantial disadvantage. The school is committed to promoting equal opportunities for all pupils by making reasonable adjustments and removing barriers in all areas of school life

Equal Opportunities

The school will ensure that it

 

  • Promotes equalising opportunities ensuring that all children and staff can achieve and that these achievements are valued.

 

Gender

Care will be taken, wherever possible, not to exclude students or staff from activities because of their gender.

The school's gender policy will be made explicit to new members of the school and to parents of all students at the school.

Admissions Policy 2016/2017

St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy

Queen’s Avenue, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 6EE

Admissions Policy

2016/2017

Name of School: St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy, Queen’s Avenue, Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent, ST6 6EE. St Wilfrid’s is part of the Newman Catholic Collegiate.

The admissions process is part of the Stoke-on-Trent local authority co-ordinated scheme.

The Admission Policy of the Directors of the Newman Catholic collegiate for St Wilfrid’s Catholic Primary School is as follows:

The ethos of this school is Catholic. The school was founded by the Catholic Church to provide education for children of Catholic families. The school is conducted by it’s Board of Directors as part of the Catholic Church in accordance with the Articles of Association and seeks at all times to be a witness to Jesus Christ. We ask all parents applying for a place here to respect this ethos and its importance to the school community. This does not affect the right of parents who are not of the faith of this school to apply for and be considered for a place here.

The School’s Admission Number for the school year 2016/17 is 45.

If the number of applications exceeds the admission number, the Board of Directors will give priority to applications in accordance with the criteria listed, provided that the Board of Directors are made aware of that application before decisions on admissions are made (see Note 1 below). A map of the parish boundary is available at the school and parish church or by post on request.

  1. Baptised Catholic children who are in the care of a local authority (looked-after children) or provided with accommodation by them (e.g. children with foster parents) (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989) and children who were previously looked after but ceased to be so because they were adopted or became subject to a residence order or special guardianship order.
     
  2. Baptised Catholic children (see Note 2 below) living within the Parishes of Sacred Heart Tunstall, St. Bernadette’s Fegg Hayes and that part of St Joseph’s Burslem appertaining to the school who have a brother or sister (see Note 3 below) in the school at the time of admission.
     
  3. Baptised Catholic children living within the Parishes of Sacred Heart Tunstall, St Bernadette’s Fegg Hayes and that part of St Joseph’s Burslem appertaining to the school.
  4. Other Baptised Catholic children who have a brother or sister in the school at the time of admission.
     
  5. Other Baptised Catholic children.
     
  6. Non-Catholic children who are in the care of a local authority (looked-after children) or provided with accommodation by them (e.g. children with foster parents) (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989) and children who were previously looked after but ceased to be so because they were adopted or became subject to a residence order or special guardianship order.
     
  7. Non-Catholic children who have a brother or sister in the school at the time of admission.
     
  8. Non-Catholic children.

Note 1

Children with a Statement of Special Educational Needs that names the school must be admitted. This will reduce the number of places available to applicants.  This is not an oversubscription criterion.

Note 2

In all categories, for a child to be considered as a Catholic, evidence of Catholic Baptism or Reception into the Church will be required. For a definition of a Baptised Catholic, see the Appendix. Those who face difficulties in producing written evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception should contact their Parish Priest.

Individuals with parental responsibility making an application for a Catholic child should also complete a supplementary information form (SIF). Failure to complete the SIF/provide evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception may affect the criterion the child’s name is placed in.

Note 3

For Catholic and non-Catholic children the definition of a brother or sister is:

  • A brother or sister sharing the same parents;
  • Half-brother or half-sister, where two children share one common parent;
  • Step-brother or step-sister, where two children are related by a parent’s marriage;
  • Step-brother or step-sister;
  • Adopted or fostered children

The children must be living permanently in the same household

Note 4

Distances are calculated on the basis of a straight-line measurement between the applicant’s home address and a point decided by the school, which is the main gate situated on Queen’s Avenue. The local authority uses a computerised system, which measures all distances in metres. Ordnance Survey supplies the co-ordinates that are used to plot an applicant’s home address within this system.

In a very small number of cases, it may not be possible to decide between the applications of those pupils who are the final qualifiers for a place, when applying the published admission criteria.

For example, this may occur when children in the same year group live at the same address, or if the distance between the home and school is exactly the same, for example, blocks of flats.  If there is no other way of separating the application according to the admissions criteria and to admit both, or all, of the children would cause the statutory infant class size limit to be exceeded, the Local Authority, on behalf of the Board of Directors, will use a computerised system to randomly select the child to be offered the final place. Where appropriate, the Board of Directors will give careful consideration to offering places above the Admission Number to applications from individuals with parental responsibility for children whose twin or sibling from a multiple birth is admitted even when there are no other vacant places.

The home address of a pupil is considered to be the permanent residence of a child. The address must be the child’s only or main residence for the majority of the school week. Documentary evidence may be required.

Where care is split equally between mother and father, parents must name which address is to be used for the purpose of allocating a school place and proof may be requested.

SCHOOL ENTRY

Parents must, by law, ensure that their child is receiving suitable full time education from the beginning of the term following the child's fifth birthday, when they will have begun to be of compulsory school age. Whilst a child may start school in the September following their fourth birthday, a parent may choose to defer their child’s admission until the beginning of the term following their fifth birthday; however, the child's entry may not be deferred beyond the academic year for which the parent's original application was accepted.

The parent of a child whose fifth birthday falls during the summer term who wishes to defer their child's admission to primary/infant school until the beginning of the following academic year (when the child will have begun to be of compulsory school age) will therefore need to make a separate application for a place in Year 1 at the school.  Any reception class place offered following an application made for the 2016/2017 admission round will be withdrawn if the child does not take up that place during the 2016/2017 academic year.  

Parents can request that their child attends part-time until the child reaches compulsory school age.

NURSERY

Parents must apply on their home Local Authority’s (i.e. the Local Authority to whom they pay Council Tax) Common Application Form for a place in Reception Class.  Attendance at a particular school’s nursery does not automatically guarantee that a place will be offered in the main school of that nursery.

APPEALS

Parents who wish to appeal against the decision of the Board of Directors to refuse their child a place in the school may apply in writing to the Board of Directors. Appeals will be heard by an independent panel.

REPEAT APPLICATIONS

Any parent can apply for a place for their child at any time outside the admissions round. Parents do not have the right to a second appeal in respect of the same school for the same academic year unless, in exceptional circumstances, the admission authority has accepted a second application from the appellant because of a significant and material change in the circumstances of the parent, child or school but still refused admission.

LATE APPLICATIONS

Late applications will be dealt with in accordance with the Local Authority’s co-ordinated admissions scheme.

CHANGE IN PREFERENCE

Once individuals with parental responsibility have submitted their preference, they will not be allowed to change them without an exceptional change in their circumstances, for example, if the family has recently moved address or an older sibling has changed schools. All requests to change preferences should be made in writing to the home Local Authority. Where a change of preference is submitted for an oversubscribed school, without an exceptional change in their circumstances, then the application will be refused.

WAITING LIST

Parents whose children have not been offered their preferred school will be informed of their right of appeal and will be added to their preferred schools waiting list.

The Local Authority will send voluntary aided and foundation schools their waiting lists following the offer of school places.

Waiting lists for admission will remain open until the 31 December 2016 and will then be discarded. Parents may apply for their child’s name to be reinstated until the end of the academic year when the list will be discarded.

Waiting lists will not be fixed following the offer of places. They are subject to change. This means that a child’s waiting list position during the year could go up or down. Any late applicants accepted will be added to the school’s list in accordance with the school’s oversubscription criteria.

Inclusion on a school’s waiting list does not mean that a place will eventually become available. It may be that those already offered places may accept them, thereby filling all available places.

Children who are the subject of a direction by a local authority to admit or who are allocated to a school in accordance with a Fair Access Protocol take precedence over those on a waiting list.

IN YEAR FAIR ACCESS PROTOCOL

The Board of Directors is required to participate in the Local Authority’s Fair Access Protocol for the admission of previously excluded or hard to place children.

APPLICATIONS OTHER THAN THE NORMAL INTAKE TO RECEPTION CLASS

(In-year applications)

An application should be made directly to the Board of Directors at the school.

There is no charge or cost related to the admission of a child to this school.

 

APPENDIX

DEFINITION OF A “BAPTISED CATHOLIC”

 

A “Baptised Catholic” is one who:

  • Has been baptised into full communion (Cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church, 837) with the Catholic Church by the Rites of Baptism of one of the various ritual Churches in communion with the See of Rome (i.e. Latin Rite, Byzantine Rite, Coptic, Syriac, etc, Cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1203). Written evidence* of this baptism can be obtained by recourse to the Baptismal Registers of the church in which the baptism took place (Cf. Code of Canon Law, 877 & 878).

Or

  • Has been validly baptised in a separated ecclesial community and subsequently received into full communion with the Catholic Church by the Right of Reception of Baptised Christians into the Full Communion of the Catholic Church. Written evidence of their baptism and reception into full communion with the Catholic Church can be obtained by recourse to the Register of Receptions, or in some cases, a sub-section of the Baptismal Registers of the church in which the Rite of Reception took place (Cf. Rite of Christian Initiation, 399).

WRITTEN EVIDENCE OF BAPTISM

The Board of Directors of Catholic schools will require written evidence in the form of a Certificate of Baptism or Certificate of Reception before applications for school places can be considered for categories of “Baptised Catholics”. A Certificate of Baptism or Reception is to include: the full name, date of birth, date of Baptism or Reception, and parent(s) name(s). The certificate must also show that it is copied from the records kept by the place of Baptism or Reception.

Those who would have difficulty obtaining written evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception for a good reason, may still be considered as baptised Catholics but only after they have been referred to their parish priest who, after consulting the Vicar General, will decide how the question of Baptism/Reception is to be resolved and how written evidence is to be produced in accordance with the law of the Church.

Those who would be considered to have good reason for not obtaining written evidence would include those who cannot contact the place of Baptism/Reception due to persecution or fear, the destruction of the church and the original records, or where Baptism/Reception was administered validly but not in the Parish church where records are kept.

The Board of Directors may request extra supporting evidence when the written documents that are produced do not clarify the fact that a person was baptised or received into the Catholic Church, (i.e. where the name and address of the Church is not on the certificate or where the name of the Church does not state whether it is a Catholic Church or not.)

 

DIOCESAN EDUCATION SERVICE

 

Supplementary Information Form

 

School Name:_____________________________________

The ethos of this school is Catholic. The school was founded by the Catholic Church to provide education for children of Catholic families. The school is conducted by its Board of Directors as part of the Catholic Church in accordance with its Trust Deed and Instrument of Government and seeks at all times to be a witness to Jesus Christ. We ask all parents applying for a place here to respect this ethos and its importance to the school community. This does not affect the right of parents who are not of the faith of this school to apply for and be considered for a place here.

Child’s Surname

 

Child’s First Name(s)

 

Address

 

Contact Number

 

Please tick the appropriate box:

Is the above named child a Baptised Catholic or been Received into the Catholic Church?

Yes

 

No

 

Is the certificate of Catholic Baptism/ Reception attached?

Yes

 

No

 

A certificate of Catholic Baptism/Reception should be provided in order for the application to be considered in a Catholic category.  Failure to provide evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception may affect the criterion the child’s name is placed in.

Please note that you must also complete a Local Authority Common Application Form.  This supplementary information form is only for school use to enable the Board of Directors to rank applicants using the published oversubscription criteria.

Admissions Policy 2017/2018

St. Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy

Admissions Policy

2017/2018

 

Name of Academy: St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy, Queens Avenue, Tunstall, Stoke on Trent, ST6 6EE.  St Wilfrid’s  is part of the Newman Catholic Collegiate.

The admissions process is part of the Stoke-on-Trent LA co-ordinated scheme.

The Admission Policy of the Board of Directors of the Newman Catholic Collegiate for St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy is as follows:

The ethos of this academy is Catholic. The academy was founded by the Catholic Church to provide education for children of Catholic families. The academy is conducted by its Board of Directors as part of the Catholic Church in accordance with the Articles of Association and seeks at all times to be a witness to Jesus Christ. We ask all parents applying for a place here to respect this ethos and its importance to the academy community.  This does not affect the right of parents who are not of the faith of this academy to apply for, and be considered for a place here.

The Academy’s Admission Number for the academic year 2017/18 is 45

If the number of applications exceeds the admission number, the Board of Directors will give priority to applications in accordance with the criteria listed below, provided that the Board of Directors is made aware of that application before decisions on admissions are made (see Note 1 below). If there is oversubscription within a category, Board of Directors will give priority to children living closest to the Academy determined by shortest distance (see Note 4).

A map of the parish boundary is available at the Academy and parish or by post on request.

 

1.      Baptised Catholic children (see Note 2 below) who are in the care of a local authority (children in care) or provided with accommodation by them (e.g. children with foster parents) (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989), and children who were previously looked after but ceased to be so because they were adopted or became subject to a residence order or special guardianship order.

2.      Baptised Catholic children (see Note 23 below) living within the Parish of Sacred Heart Tunstall, St Bernadette’s Fegg Hayes and that part of St Joseph’s Burslem,who have a brother or sister (see Note 3 below) in the Academy at the time of admission

3.      Baptised Catholic children living within the Parish of Sacred Heart Tunstall, St Bernadette’s Fegg Hayes and that part of St Joseph’s Burslem, appertaining to the school.

4.      Other Baptised Catholic children who have a brother or sister in the academy at the time of admission

5.      Other Baptised Catholic children

6.      Non-Catholic children who are in the care of a local authority (children in care) or provided with accommodation by them (e.g. children with foster parents) (Section 22 of the Children Act 1989), and children who were previously looked after but ceased to be so because they were adopted (or became subject to a residence order or special guardianship order).

7.      Non-Catholic children who have a brother or sister in the academy at the time of admission

8.      Non-Catholic children

 

OVER-SUBSCRIPTION

If there is over-subscription within the category, the Board of Directors will give priority to children living closest to the academy determined by shortest distance.  Distances are calculated on the basis of a straight-line measurement between the front door of the applicant’s home address and the front gate of the academy in Queens Road.  The Local Authority uses a computerised system, which measures all distances in miles. Ordnance Survey supply the co-ordinates that are used to plot an applicant’s home address within this system (see note 4).

In a very small number of cases it may not be able to decide between the applicants of those pupils who are qualifiers for a place, when applying the published admission criteria.

For example, this may occur when children in the same year group live at the same address, or if the distance between the home and academy is exactly the same, for example, blocks of flats.  If there is no other way of separating the application according to the admissions criteria and to admit both or all of the children would cause the legal limit to be exceeded, the Local Authority will use a computerised system to randomly select the child to be offered the final place. As an exception, the Board of Directors will give careful consideration to offering places above the Admission Number to applications from children whose twin or sibling from a multiple birth is admitted even when there are no other vacant places.

Note 1

Children with a Statement of Special Educational Needs or an Education, Health and Care (EHC) Plan that names the academy must be admitted. This will reduce the number of places available to applicants.

 

Note 2

In all categories, for a child to be considered as a Catholic, evidence of Catholic Baptism or Reception into the Church will be required. For a definition of a Baptised Catholic see the Appendix. Those who face difficulties in producing written evidence of Baptism/Reception should contact their Parish Priest.

Failure to provide evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception may affect the criterion the child’s name is placed in.

Note 3

For Catholic and non-Catholic children the definition of a brother or sister is:

·         A brother or sister sharing the same parents;

·         Half-brother or half-sister, where two children share one common parent;

·         Step-brother or step-sister, where two children are related by a parent’s marriage;

·         Step-brother or step-sister;

·         Adopted or fostered children

The children must be living permanently in the same household

Note 4

The home address of a pupil is considered to be the permanent residence of a child. The address must be the child’s only or main residence for the majority of the school week. Documentary evidence may be required.

Where care is split equally between mother and father, parents must name which address is to be used for the purpose of allocating a place and proof may be requested.

 

SCHOOL ENTRY

Children must, by law, start school by the beginning of the term after their fifth birthday.  A parent may defer a child’s entry to the school, but not beyond the academic year for which the application is accepted. Parents may discuss this with the headteacher.

Parents can request that their child attends part-time until the child reaches compulsory school age.

 

APPLICATIONS FOR CHILDREN TO BE ADMITTED INTO A CLASS OUTSIDE OF THEIR NORMAL AGE GROUP

If parents wish for their child to be considered for admission to a class outside of their normal age group, they must make an application for the normal age group in the first instance.  Parents must then submit a formal request to the Board of Directors.  This request should be in the form of a written letter of application outlining the reasons why you wish for your child to be considered to be admitted into a class outside of their normal age group and enclosing any supportive evidence and documentation that you wish to be taken into account as part of that request.  The Board of Directors will consider requests submitted and advise the parents of the outcome of that request before the national offer day, having taken into account the information provided by the parents, the child’s best interests and the views of the head teacher.

If parents are considering submitting an application for their child to be admitted into a class outside of their normal age group, it is strong recommended that they also read the DFE guidance which can be found at:

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/summer-born-children-school-admission

 

NURSERY

Parents must apply on the LA form for a place in Reception Class.  Attendance at a nursery does not automatically guarantee that a place will be offered in the main academy.

 

APPEALS

Parents who wish to appeal against the decision of the Board of Directors to refuse their child a place in the Academy may apply in writing to Chair of the Board of Directors at the Academy address.Appeals will be heard by an independent panel.

 

REPEAT APPLICATIONS

Any parent can apply for a place for their child at any time outside the admissions round. Parents do not have the right to a second appeal in respect of the same academy for the same academic year unless, in exceptional circumstances, the admission authority has accepted a second application from the appellant because of a significant and material change in the circumstances of the parent, child or academy but still refused admission.

 

LATE APPLICATIONS

Late applications will be dealt with according to the LA co-ordinated scheme.

 

WAITING LIST

Waiting lists for admission will remain open until the end of December 2017 and will then be discarded.  Parents may apply for their child’s name to be reinstated until the end of the academic year when the list will be discarded. The waiting list will be kept by the Board of Directors in admission criteria order.  When a new child joins the waiting list, all applicants on that list will be re-ranked to ensure that the list is always maintained in oversubscription criteria order. This means that a child’s position on the waiting list could go up or down. Inclusion of a child’s name on the waiting list does not mean that a place will eventually become available.

Children who are the subject of a direction by a local authority to admit or who are allocated to a school in accordance with a Fair Access Protocol take precedence over those on a waiting list.

 

APPLICATIONS OTHER THAN THE NORMAL INTAKE TO RECEPTION CLASS (In-year applications)

Anapplication should be made directly to the Board of Directors at the academy.

There is no charge or cost related to the admission of a child to this academy.

 

APPENDIX

DEFINITION OF A “BAPTISED CATHOLIC”

 

A “Baptised Catholic” is one who:

·         Has been baptised into full communion (Cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church, 837) with the Catholic Church by the Rites of Baptism of one of the various ritual Churches in communion with the See of Rome (i.e. Latin Rite, Byzantine Rite, Coptic, Syriac, etc, Cf. Catechism of the Catholic Church, 1203). Written evidence* of this baptism can be obtained by recourse to the Baptismal Registers of the church in which the baptism took place (Cf. Code of Canon Law, 877 & 878).

Or

·         Has been validly baptised in a separated ecclesial community and subsequently received into full communion with the Catholic Church by the Rite of Reception of Baptised Christians into the Full Communion of the Catholic Church. Written evidence of their baptism and reception into full communion with the Catholic Church can be obtained by recourse to the Register of Receptions, or in some cases, a sub-section of the Baptismal Registers of the church in which the Rite of Reception took place (Cf. Rite of Christian Initiation, 399).

WRITTEN EVIDENCE OF BAPTISM

The Governing bodies or Boards of Directors of Catholic schools and academies will require written evidence in the form of a Certificate of Baptism or Certificate of Reception before applications for school places can be considered for categories of “Baptised Catholics”. A Certificate of Baptism or Reception is to include: the full name, date of birth, date of Baptism or Reception, and parent(s) name(s). The certificate must also show that it is copied from the records kept by the place of Baptism or Reception.

Those who would have difficulty obtaining written evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception for a good reason, may still be considered as Baptised Catholics but only after they have been referred to their parish priest who, after consulting the Vicar General, will decide how the question of Baptism/Reception is to be resolved and how written evidence is to be produced in accordance with the law of the Church.

Those who would be considered to have good reason for not obtaining written evidence would include those who cannot contact the place of Baptism/Reception due to persecution or fear, the destruction of the church and the original records, or where Baptism/Reception was administered validly but not in the Parish church where records are kept.

Governors or Boards of Directors may request extra supporting evidence when the written documents that are produced do not clarify the fact that a person was baptised or received into the Catholic Church, (i.e. where the name and address of the Church is not on the certificate or where the name of the Church does not state whether it is a Catholic Church or not.)

                                     

DIOCESAN EDUCATION SERVICE

 

Supplementary Information Form

 

Academy Name:_____________________________________

 

The ethos of this academy is Catholic. The academy was founded by the Catholic Church to provide education for children of Catholic families. The academy is conducted by its Board of Directors as part of the Catholic Church in accordance with the Articles of Association and seeks at all times to be a witness to Jesus Christ. We ask all parents applying for a place here to respect this ethos and its importance to the Academy community.  This does not affect the right of parents who are not of the faith of this Academy to apply for and be considered for a place here.

 

Child’s Surname

 

Child’s First Name(s)

 

Address

 

Contact Number

 

 

 

Please tick the appropriate box:

Is the above named child a Baptised Catholic or been Received into the Catholic Church?

Yes

 

No

 

Is the certificate of Catholic Baptism/ Reception attached?

Yes

 

No

 

 

A certificate of Catholic Baptism/Reception should be provided in order for the application to be considered in a Catholic category.  Failure to provide evidence of Catholic Baptism/Reception may affect the criterion the child’s name is placed in.

Please note that you must also complete a local authority application form.  This supplementary information form is only for academy use to enable the Board of Directors to rank applicants using the published criteria.

Adverse Weather Policy

Introduction

This policy is based on the guidance from the City Council from the December 2008 update from the LA.

School Closure Procedure

When a school has to close for an unexpected reason, a decision is made by the headteacher or, in his/her absence, the Deptuy Headteacher. It is important that the following are informed;

  1. The Chair of Governors

  2. The LA be telephoning the Director’s office on 236100

  3. If appropriate, to inform parents via Radio Stoke (221261 or 221265), and Signal Radio (441300). The radio stations will ask for the school’s DFES number and LA password. This is known to the Headteacher, Deputy and Office Manager.

  4. Key members of staff as designated on the ‘adverse weather contact sheet’ given to all staff which ensures that all staff are contacted by their line managers.

The decision to close a school is the responsibility of the Headteacher or Deputy Headteacher. The prime concern is the well being and safety of the pupils and staff.

When the school is in session and affected by poor weather conditions, the key question is whether pupils would be safer leaving early. Consideration must be given to the age of the pupils and, for younger pupils, whether parents will be at home. For pupils who can walk between school and home, it is perhaps safer to close at the normal time but to leave the responsibility with the parents to collect their own child earlier, if they wish to do so. For pupils using public transport or a school bus, then advice should be sought from the company and, if pupils are to be released earlier, parents need to be informed.

When, because of weather conditions, the question arises about the closing the school rather than normal opening, the following procedure should be in place;

  • The decision is made by the Headteacher or Deputy Headteacher. Consideration should be based on the condition of the site and surrounding area and the supervision of pupils when on site. In order to assess the latter, each school should establish a procedure whereby staff can inform the Headteacher of any difficulties to get to work on time.

  • If the Headteacher decides to close the school the procedures in Section 1(a to d) must be followed.

  • Parents will be informed via the ‘Teacher to Parents’ text message service, via the Learning Platform and by an announcement on Radio Stoke and Signal Radio.

  • It is the assumption of the City Council that its employees will report for work. It remains the view of the Education and Lifelong Learning Department that employees should not expect to be paid when they do not work because, by choice, they live where they do. Duties will be allocated to the undertaken at home for the period of the school closure.

The guidance for school staff under the control of Governors remains as follows;

  • Schools Remaining Open – any staff member who does not arrive at work because it is too dangerous will be allocated work by the headteacher or line manager to be completed at home.

  • Schools Closed to Pupils Only – staff failing to report for duty should not be paid. Staff who reported for duty but undertook reduced duties should be paid as normal.

  • Schools are Closed – where staff are informed that they would not be required to attend for duty they will be allocated work by the headteacher or line manager to be completed at home

  • Casual Employees / Supply Staff – where casual / supply staff arrived or departed early due to the inclement weather, they should be permitted to make up the hours lost at a later date in order to minimise loss of pay.

NB: Some of the Trade Unions would want to argue that staff should be paid whether they report for work or not. This is not the view of theLA nor most employees in the City. It is this issue which causes the most public criticism about school closures.

Safety of the site

The school has a Gritting Policy. The Governing Body needs to be aware that there should be procedures in place to minimise the dangers of slipping on frost, snow and ice in outside areas and on access routes. Pedestrian walkways should be clearly marked to encourage visitors, parents and pupils to walk on these “safer” areas. Caretakers need to keep abreast of the latest weather conditions.

Conclusion

The Governing Body needs to confirm the advice of the City Council and to ensure that, as and when appropriate, the process is clear to parents, staff and the LA

Reviewed October 2011 Review alongside City Policy

Anti-Bullying Policy

Introduction

Bullying affects everyone, not just the bullies and the victims. It also affects those other children who watch, and less aggressive pupils can be drawn in by group pressure. Bullying is not an inevitable part of school life or a necessary part of growing up, and it rarely sorts itself out. It is clear that certain jokes, insults, intimidating/threatening behaviour, written abuse and violence are to be found in our society. No one person or group, whether staff or pupil, should have to accept this type of behaviour. Only when all issues are addressed, will a child best be able to benefit from the opportunities available at the school.

Why is an Anti-Bullying Policy Necessary?

The school believes that its pupils have the right to learn in a supportive, caring and safe environment without fear of being bullied.

All institutions, both large and small, contain some numbers of pupils with the potential for bullying behaviour. If a school is well disciplined and organised, it can minimise the occurrence of bullying. The school also has a clear policy on the promotion of good citizenship, where it is made clear that bullying is a form of anti-social behaviour. It is wrong and will not be tolerated. It is important therefore that the school has a clear written policy to promote this belief, where both pupils and parents/guardians are fully aware that any bullying complaints will be dealt with firmly, fairly and promptly.

What is Bullying?

Bullying can occur through several types if anti-social behaviour. It can be;

Physical - a child can be physically punched, kicked, hit, spat at, etc

Verbal - Verbal abuse can take the form of name calling. It may be directed towards gender, ethnic origin, physical/social disability, or personality etc

Exclusion - A child can be bullied simply by being excluded from discussions/activities, with those they believe to be their friends.

Damage to property or theft - Pupils may have their property damaged or stolen. Physical threats may be used by the bully in order that the pupil hands over property to them.

What Can You Do If You Are Being Bullied?

  • Remember that your silence is the bully’s greatest weapon.

  • Tell yourself that you do not deserve to be bullied and that it is wrong!

  • Be proud of who you are. It is good to be an individual.

  • Try not to show that you are upset. It is hard but a bully thrives on someone’s fear.

  • Stay with a group “ NO”. Walk confidently away. Go straight to a teacher or member of staff

  • Fighting back may make things worse. If you decide to fight back, talk to a teacher or parent/guardian first.

  • Generally it is best to tell an adult you trust straight away. You will get immediate support.

  • Talk to the Learning Mentor

  • All the staff in the school will take you seriously and will know how to deal with bullies in a way which will end the bullying and will not make things worse for you.

What to Do if You Know Someone is Being Bullied

  • TAKE ACTION! Watching and doing nothing looks as if you are on the side of the bully. It makes the victim feel more unhappy and on their own.

  • If you feel you cannot get involved, tell an adult IMMEDIATELY. Teachers have ways of dealing with the bully without getting you into trouble.

  • Do not be, or pretend to be, friends with a bully

  • Talk to the school’s Learning Mentor

What to Do as a Parent

  • Look for unusual behaviour in your children. For example, they may suddenly not wish to attend school, feel ill regularly, or not complete work to their normal standard.

  • Always take an active role in your child’s education. Enquire how their day has gone, who they have spent their time with, how lunch was spent etc

  • If you feel your child may be a victim of bullying behaviour, inform the school IMMEDIATELY. Your complaint will be taken seriously and appropriate action will follow.

  • It is important that you advise your child not to fight back. It can make matters worse.

  • Tell your own son/daughter there is nothing wrong with him/her. It is not his/her fault that they are being bullied.

  • Make sure your child is fully aware of the school policy concerning bullying, and that they will not be afraid to ask for help.

As a School we will;

  • Organise the community in order to minimise opportunities for bullying, eg provide increased supervision at problem times

  • Use any opportunity to discuss aspects of bullying, and the appropriate way to behave towards each other, e.g. the PSHE programme

  • Deal quickly, firmly and fairly with any complaints, involving parents where necessary

  • Review the school policy and its degree of success

  • The school staff will continue to have a firm but fair discipline structure. The rules should be few, simple and easy to understand.

  • The school will not use teaching materials or equipment which give a bad or negative view of any group because of their ethnic origin/sex etc

  • Encourage pupils to discuss how they get on with other people and to form positive attitudes towards other people. This includes a review of what friendship really is.

  • Encourage pupils to treat everyone with respect

  • Treat bullying as a serious offence and take every possible action to eradicate it from our school

  • Monitor and record all incidents

Action to be Taken When Bullying is Suspected

If bullying is suspected we talk to the suspected victim, the suspected bully and any witnesses. Help, support and counselling will be given as is appropriate to both the victims and bullies. If any degree of bullying is identified, the following action will be taken;

To Support the Victims we will;

  • Offer immediate opportunities to talk about the experience with the Class Teacher, Learning Mentor or any other adult the child may choose

  • Inform the victims parents/guardians

  • Offer continued support

  • Arrange for the children to be escorted to and from the school premises

  • Apply one or more of the disciplinary steps described below to prevent further incidents

To Discipline and Help the Bullies we will;

  • Talk about what happened to discover why they became involved

  • Inform the parents/ guardians of the bullies

  • Continue to work with the bullies in order to get rid of prejudiced attitudes as far as possible

  • Apply one or more of the seven disciplinary steps described below to prevent more bullying

DISCIPLINARY STEPS

  • Bullies will be warned officially to stop offending in accordance with the behaviour policy

  • The parents/guardians of bullies will be informed of all incidents

  • Bullies will be excluded from the school premises at lunchtime and isolated during break times

  • The school has the right to request that the bully be escorted to and from the premises

  • Persistent bullying will result is a fixed term exclusion for 1 or 2 days

  • If the bullying continues the exclusion period will be increased to 5 days or for an indefinite period

  • Permanent Exclusion

Last Reviewed

May 2012 Next review May 2014

Assessment & Marking Policy

Aims and Objectives:

For all involved in the process (teachers and pupils);

  • to provide a dialogue between teacher and pupil

  • to improve motivation and self esteem

  • to correct and assess

  • to provide the opportunity for self evaluation

  • to reflect, extend and challenge

  • to evaluate teaching effectiveness

  • to involve pupils and teachers in setting, working towards and monitoring pupil targets

Implementation

Where possible the marking of a piece of work should be done alongside the child. Where this is not possible a consistent approach needs to be used.

Title of a piece of work

  • The title of a piece of work is a detailed, specific learning objective.

  • Where appropriate, the learning objective will be converted to language which is more easily understood by the children.

Working status of the individual

Indicate at the end of a piece of work whether the child worked with a teacher, another adult or independently when completing that piece of work.

  • T = worked with the teacher

  • OA = worked with another adult (e.g. teaching assistant, SENCO)

  • I = worked independently

If a child is absent it is important to record on the child’s work the learning objective of the work missed and the appropriate date.

Traffic Light System

A traffic light system will be used to highlight parts of children’s work in order to celebrate their successes and to indicate to children where improvements can be made.

Green – correct work, target met, good effort, well presented

Orange – mostly correct work, most of target met, quite well presented

Pink – (mostly) incorrect work, target not met, poorly presented

In KS1 to enhance children’s understanding of what the annotations to their work mean in general terms, the following should be shared verbally with all the children upon introduction of the policy and displayed visually in the classroom so that the children can constantly refer to it:

Green = I got there

Orange = nearly there

Pink = still a long way to go

Self-Evaluation

(The process of a pupil gaining an understanding of how one is learning as opposed to what one is learning. It is the means of making real strides in understanding oneself as a learner. Aaia Association for Achievement and Improvement through Assessment document entitled Self-Assessment www.aaia.org.uk)

In Key Stage 1 children draw a ‘face’ to assess and record their feelings towards a piece of work on completion of the piece of work.

=...I feel very good about this... I did my best... It’s neat It’s correct... I met my target...

 

=...I feel OK about this...It’s quite neat but I could have tried a bit harder It’s mostly correct...

= I’m not very happy about this piece of work I didn’t try my best at all... I could do it a lot better

In Key Stage 2 this has been complemented by incorporating a system to, facilitate each child to become more responsible for improving his / her own work:

U = Understanding

P = Presentation

E = Effort

To enhance children’s understanding of what the annotations to their work actually mean in more specific terms for understanding, presentation and effort, the following should be shared verbally with all the children upon introduction of the policy and displayed visually in the classroom so that the children can constantly refer to it:

Understanding

Green = I know what to do.

Orange = I know how to do some bits.

Pink = I don’t know what to do.

Presentation

Green = My work is neat and tidy

Orange = My work could be neater

Pink = My work is untidy.

Effort

Green = I tried my best.

Orange = I could have tried harder.

Pink = I didn’t try at all.

Marking Comments

Marking comments should focus on the learning objective. Comments on children’s work should:-

  • provide children with opportunities to reflect on / deepen their understanding.

  • provide children with opportunities to demonstrate that they have the ability to work at a higher level.

  • provide children with focussed feedback on where their errors and misconceptions lie, making it clear what is wrong and what to do to put it right. If it is likely to be more beneficial to speak to the child directly, a comment like “Can you explain this to me?” and a follow up conversation with the child would be better.

Where comments are made in relation to understanding, presentation and effort, the comment should qualify the highlighted colour e.g. if presentation was highlighted orange a comment might read “Please set your work out like this,” followed by the correct presentation being modelled. Comments may also be made which highlight individual improvement over a period of time e.g. by comparing two pieces of work from the same child where the later piece of work demonstrates the child’s ability to have met a target attached to a previous piece of work.

Target Setting

Targets which are appropriate to the learning objective and to the child’s ability should be shared at the beginning of the lesson.

e.g. The teacher shares the learning objectives at the beginning of the lesson for the mental oral starter – “I expect that everyone will be able to count in 3s to 30, most of you will be able to recall multiples of 3 when they are not in order, some of you will be able to rapidly recall the appropriate division fact as well.”

When the expectations are made explicit, each child is able to measure what he/she can do, and identify the next step in order to improve.

At the end of a lesson, or series of lessons, the teacher will inform pupils of future learning. The teacher and / or pupil can then set appropriate targets.

Pupils with Special Educational Needs and /or Disabilities

The school will:-

  • Promote equality of opportunity for disabled people: pupils, staff, parents, carers and other people who use the school or may wish to; and

At St. Wilfrid’s we aim to build on the distinctive Catholic ethos and success of our school, through our commitment to the Every Child Matters’ framework.

 

Every pupil with additional needs in this inclusive school has an entitlement to fulfil his/ her optimum potential.

This is achieved by ensuring the well being of all pupils in relation to; being healthy, staying safe, enjoying and achieving, making a positive contribution, and achieving social and economic well-being”

 

At St. Wilfrid’s, we are committed to ensuring equality of opportunity for:

  • Pupils with disabilities in relation to education and associated services

  • Staff with disabilities in relation to employment rights, conditions and opportunities

  • All parents and members of the local community with disabilities in relation to additional services offered by, or at our school.

We aim to enable all pupils including those with Additional Educational Needs, Special Educational Needs and/ or disabilities, ethnic minorities to have access to a broad and balanced curriculum by making reasonable adjustments to ensure that no pupil is placed at a substantial disadvantage. The school is committed to promoting equal opportunities for all pupils by making reasonable adjustments

and removing barriers in all areas of school life

Equal Opportunities

The school will ensure that it promotes equalising opportunities ensuring that all children and staff can achieve and that these achievements are valued.

Gender

  • Care will be taken, wherever possible, not to exclude students or staff from activities because of their gender.

 

  • The school’s gender policy will be made explicit to new members of the school and to parents of all students at the school.

Racial Equality

  • Racist remarks and behaviour will be challenged immediately, firmly and consistently.

  • All racist incidents will be dealt with immediately. All staff - including dinnertime supervisors - are aware of “Racist Incident” forms. We will endeavour to ensure that all children are aware of the forms, and how to access them.

  • Review 2015

Asthma Policy

 

St. Wilfrid’s

Asthma Policy

 

St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academies aim to welcome and support pupils with asthma. We ensure that the whole school environment, which includes physical, social, sporting and educational activities, is inclusive and favorable to children with asthma.

 

We ensure all staff understand their duty of care to children and young people in the event of an emergency.

 

All staff feels confident in knowing what to do in an emergency.

 

All new school staff receives asthma awareness training.

 

St Peter’s and St Wilfrid’s have clear guidance on the administration and storage of medicines at school.

 

We have clear guidance about record keeping.

 

Each member of the school and health community know their roles and responsibilities in maintaining and implementing an effective medical condition policy.

 

The asthma policy is regularly reviewed evaluated and updated.

 

Updates occur every year.

 

Policy Guidelines

 

·        St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy have an inclusive community that aims to support and welcome children with asthma.

·         Every Asthmatic child should have an inhaler in school at all times – stored with their individual Care Plan plus Parental consent for staff to administer medicine and  to carry medicine in the class Emergency container/bag

·         Children with asthma are encouraged to take control of their condition

·         Children feel confident in the support they receive from the school to help them do this

 

Children with asthma are included in all school activities

 

·         All staff feel confident in knowing what to do in an emergency

·         The school asthma policy is understood and supported by the whole school and local health community

·         All Emergency packs/Individual Health Care Plans are to be stored in each class

·         Inhalers must be taken out in the event of a Fire alarm – where possible (DO NOT re-enter the building)

·         All Emergency packs must be taken on all trips – including Church and Swimming

·         When swimming, inhalers must also be taken and be stored in a see through plastic bag and placed at the poolside

 

We ensure that the whole school environment, which includes physical, social, sporting and educational activities, is inclusive and favourable to children with asthma.

 St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy is committed to providing children with a physical environment, which is accessible to children with asthma.

 

Our commitment to an accessible physical environment includes out of school visits and the school ensures these visits are accessible to all children.

 

We ensure the needs of children and young people with asthma are adequately considered to ensure they have full access to extended school activities such as school productions, after school clubs and residential visits.

 

All staff at St Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy are aware of the potential social problems that children with asthma may experience.

 

Staff use this knowledge to try to prevent and deal with problems in accordance with the school’s anti bullying and behaviour policies.

 

Staff use opportunities such as personal, social and health education (PSHE) lessons to raise awareness of asthma amongst children and to help create a positive social environment.

 

All classroom teachers, TAs and sporting coaches understand that pupil’s with asthma should not be forced to take part in activity if they feel unwell.

 

We ensure all classroom teachers and TAs are aware of the potential triggers for pupil’s asthma when exercising and are aware of ways to minimise these triggers.

 

WE ensure all children have the appropriate medicines with them during physical activity and that children take them when needed.

 

Risk assessments are carried out for any out of school visit and asthma is always considered during this process.

 

Factors considered include how routine and emergency medicines will be stored and administered and where help could be obtained in an emergency.

 

There may be additional medicines, equipment or factors to consider when planning residential visits. These may be in addition to any medicines, facilities and healthcare plans that are normally available in school.

 

All staff understand asthma and are trained in what to do in an emergency

 

Staff  understand their duty of care to children in the event of an emergency.

 

In an emergency situation school staff are required under common law duty of care, to act like any reasonably prudent parent. This may include administering medicines.

 

All staff who work with children at this school receive training and know what to do in an emergency for the children in their care with asthma.

 

Training is refreshed for all staff once a year.

 

We use school asthma healthcare plans to inform the appropriate staff (including supply teachers and support staff), of children in their care who may need emergency help.

St Wilfrid’s have procedures in place for a copy of the pupil’s health care plan to be sent to the emergency care setting with the pupil. On occasions when this is not possible, the form is sent or the information on it is communicated to the hospital as soon as possible.

 

If a pupil needs to be taken to hospital, a member of staff will always accompany them and will stay with them until a parent arrives. The school tries to ensure that the staff member will be one the pupil knows

 

Generally staff should not take children to hospital in their own car.

 

St Wilfrid’s have a  clear guidance on the administration of medicines at school

 

From 1stOctober 2014 the Human Medicines Regulations 2014 will allow schools to keep a salbutamol inhaler for use in emergencies.

 

The emergency salbutamol inhaler should only be used by children, for whom written parental consent for use of the emergency inhaler has been given, who have either been diagnosed with asthma and prescribed an inhaler, or who have been prescribed an inhaler as reliever medication.

The inhaler can only be used if the pupils inhaler is not available ( for example, because it is empty or broken)

 

St Wilfrid’s have ‘THREE RED Emergency Rucksacks’ these include:

 

·         one salbutamol inhaler and two spacers, which are all clearly labelled

·         Register of Parental Consent

·         ‘RED’ Asthma Emergency Note – to go home

·         School Emergency inhaler usage logbook – Staff must record usage

 

STAFF MUST ALSO RECORD THE USAGE IN THE MAIN ASTHMA REGISTER LOCATED IN THE SCHOOL OFFICE STATING THAT IT IS THE SCHOOLS EMERGENCY INHALER THAT HAS BEEN USED

 

These are located as follows:

·         School Office

·         Staffroom

·         Foundation Stage (Reception Demountable)

 

TO AVOID POSSIBLE RISK OF CROSS INFECTION THE PLASTIC SPACER IS NOT TO BE RE-USED AND MUST BE SENT HOME WITH THE CHILD (FOR FUTURE PERSONAL USE)

 

Staff Responsibilities

 

Staff are responsible for ensuring that:

·         Staff are available to support in an emergency situation

·         Inhalers are checked monthly

·         Replacement inhalers are obtained before the expiry date

·         Replacement spacers are re-ordered and replaced after use

·         Empty/out of date Inhalers are given to parents to dispose of.

 

 

All Staff responsibilities:

 

·         The blue plastic inhaler ‘housing’ is cleaned and dried and returned to the relevant place after use

·         Staff must inform the Asthma Lead/s if a school emergency inhaler has been used so that a new spacer can be ordered

·         School Emergency inhaler usage logbook – Staff must record usage

·         STAFF MUST ALSO RECORD THE USAGE IN THE MAIN ASTHMA REGISTER LOCATED IN THE SCHOOL OFFICE STATING THAT IT IS THE SCHOOLS EMERGENCY INHALER THAT HAS BEEN USED

 

Emergency medicines

 

·         All children at St Wilfrid’s with asthma have easy access to their emergency medicines

·         All children are encouraged to carry and administer their own emergency medicine, when their parents and health specialists determine they are able to start taking responsibility for their condition

·         Children who do not carry and administer their own emergency medicines, should know where the drugs or medicines are stored and how to gain access

·         All school staff have been informed through training that they are required, under common law duty of care, to act like any reasonably prudent parent. In an emergency situation, this may include taking action such as administering medicines

 

Safe storage - emergency medicine

 

·         Emergency medicines are readily available to children who require them at all times during the school day or at off-site activities

  • Most children at this school carry their emergency medicine on them at all times. Children keep their own emergency medicines securely
  • Children are reminded to carry take their emergency medicines with them at all times
  • Children, whose healthcare professionals and parents advise the school that their child is not yet able or old enough to self manage and carry their own emergency medicines on them, know exactly where to access their emergency medicines

 

Safe storage - general

 

  • All medicines are supplied and stored, wherever possible, in their original containers. All medicines need to be labelled with the pupil’s name, the name of the medicine, expiry date and the prescriber’s instructions for administration, including dose and frequency
  • Medicines are stored in accordance with instructions paying particular note to temperature
  • Some medicines for children at this school may need to be refrigerated. All refrigerated medicines are stored in an airtight container and are clearly labelled. Refrigerators used for medicine storage are in a secure area inaccessible to children without supervision or lockable as appropriate
  • All medicines are sent home with children at the end of the school year. Medicines are not stored in school over the summer holidays
  • It is the parent’s responsibility to ensure new and in date medicines come into school on the first day of the new academic year

 

Safe disposal

 

  • Parents are asked to collect out of date inhalers from school
  • If parents do not pick up out of date medicines or at the end of the school year medicines are taken to a local pharmacy for safe disposal
  • Class teachers are responsible for checking the dates of inhalers and arranging for the disposal of those that have expired. This check is done at least three times a year.
  • St Peter’s and St Wilfrid’s have clear guidance about record keeping

 

School Asthma Register

 

  • The school Asthma Health Care Plans are used to create a register of children with asthma
  • An identified member of staff (SENCO) has responsibility for the register at this school
  • The responsible member of staff follows up any of the details on a pupil’s Asthma Health Care Plan or if permission for administration of medicines is unclear or incomplete
  • Parents are regularly reminded to update their child’s Asthma Health Care Plan if their child has a medical emergency or if there have been changes to their symptoms (getting better or worse) or their medicines and treatments change
  • Staff use opportunities such as teacher-parent interviews to check that information held by the school on a pupil’s condition is accurate and up to date
  • Health care plans are kept in a secure central location at school
  • All members of staff who work with groups of children, have access to the health care plans of children in their care
  • When a member of staff is new to a pupil group, the school makes sure that they are made aware of (and have access to) the health care plans of children in their care
  • St Wilfrid’s ensures that all staff protect pupil confidentiality
  • We seek permission from parents to allow the health care plan to be sent ahead to emergency care staff should an emergency happen during school hours or at an out of school hours school activity.

 

St Wilfrid’s use the health care plans to:

 

  • Inform the appropriate staff and a supply teachers about the individual needs of a pupil with a medical condition in their care
  • Identify common or important individual pupil triggers at school that bring on symptoms and can cause emergencies
  • Ensure that all medicines stored at school are within the expiry date
  • Ensure this school’s local emergency care facilities have a timely and accurate summary of a pupil’s current asthma management and healthcare in the event of an emergency
  • Remind parents of children with asthma to ensure that any medicines kept at school for their child are within their expiry dates

Consent to administer medicines

 

  • All parents of children with asthma are asked to provide consent on the health care plan giving staff permission to administer medicines in an emergency
  • If a child requires regular/daily help in administering their medicines then we will outline our agreement to administer those medicine/s on the health care plan. The school and parents keep a copy of this agreement
  • Parents of children with asthma are all asked at the start of the school year on the healthcare plan if they and/or the child’s healthcare professional believe the child is able to self manage, carry and administer their own emergency medicines
  • Parents are sent a medicines form to be completed and returned to school shortly before their child leaves for an overnight or extended day trip. This form requests up to date information about the pupil’s current condition and their overall health. This provides up to date information to relevant staff to help the pupil manage their condition while they are away including information about medicines not normally taken during school hours
  • The medicines form is taken by the relevant staff member to the off-site trip and for all out of school hours activities along with a copy of the pupil’s health care plan
  • All parents of children with asthma attending a school trip or overnight visit are asked to give consent for staff to administer medicines at night or in the morning if required
  • The medical form also details what medicines and what dosage the pupil is currently taking at different times of the day. It helps to provide up-to-date information to relevant staff and supervisors to help the pupil manage their condition while they are away

 

Other record keeping

 

We keep an accurate record of each occasion an individual pupil is given or supervised taking medicines. Details of the supervising staff member, pupil, dose, date and time are recorded

Asthma –

  • Record on Daily Record Sheet – In Class and also:
  • Record in Asthma Book – located in the main office.

If a pupil refuses to have medicines administered, this is also recorded and parents are informed as soon as possible

 

The parents have a responsibility to:

 

  • Tell the school if their child has asthma
  • Ensure the school has a complete and up-to-date school healthcare plan for their child
  • Inform the school about the medicines their child requires during school hours
  • Inform the school of any medicines the child requires while taking part in visits, outings or field trips and other out-of-school activities such as school team sports
  • Tell the school about any changes to their child’s medicines, what they take and how much
  • Inform the school of any changes to their child’s condition
  • Ensure their medicines and medical devices are labeled with their full name
  • Ensure that their child’s medicines are within their expiry dates
  • Keep their child at home if they are not well enough to attend school
  • Ensure their child catches up on any school work they have missed
  • Ensure their child has regular reviews with their doctor or specialist healthcare professional
  • Ensure their child has a written self-management plan from their doctor or specialist healthcare professional to help them manage their child’s condition

 

All staff have a responsibility to:

 

  • Be aware of the potential triggers, signs and symptoms of asthma and know what to do in an emergency
  • Understand the school’s asthma policy
  • Know which children have asthma and be familiar with the content of their individual health plan
  • Allow all children to have immediate access to their emergency medicines
  • Maintain effective communication with parents including informing them if their child has been unwell at school
  • Ensure children who carry their inhalers with them, have them when they go on a school trip or out of the classroom
  • Be aware that long term conditions can affect a pupil’s learning and provide extra help when children need it
  • Be aware of children with asthma who may need extra social support
  • Liaise with parents, the child’s healthcare professionals, special educational needs coordinator and welfare officers if a child is falling behind with their work because of their condition
  • Use opportunities such as PSHE to raise pupil awareness about asthma
  • Understand asthma and the impact it can have on children. (Children should not be forced to take part in activity if they feel unwell)
  • Ensure all children with asthma are not excluded from activities they wish to take part in
  • Ensure children have the appropriate medicines with them during activity or exercise and are allowed to take it when needed.

 

 

 

 

Reviewed:…………………………………………  Signed: ………………………………………………………………

Attendance and Recording of Absences Policy

GENERAL STATEMENT

The school will do all in its power to ensure the regular attendance of all pupils in school of legal school age.

Registration & Absence Marking

The school will seek to achieve its general statement by the following:

  • Morning registration takes place from 8.45am when children are able to enter the class to self register and order break time food.

  • Registers are then checked by teachers at 9am.

  • School officially starts at 9.00am at which point all children should have arrived in school. At the call of the register or as the TA transfers the self registration details, all children present should be marked present (P on the OMR register) and any child not present in the class marked absent (A on the OMR register).

  • The registers close at 9.30am. Any child arriving between 9.00am and 9.30am will enter school via the office reception and the office staff will mark the register as both P and A. This then records the child as ‘late before the close of register’ (L) when the absences are administered by the Admin Assistant. L is recorded as a present but late for session.

  • Any child arriving after 9.30am will enter school via the office reception and will remain as (A) absent on the register. Late arrivals after 9.30am will be recorded as ‘late after close of register’ (@) when the absences are administered by the Admin Assistant. @ is recorded as an unauthorised absence and late for session.

  • Children that arrive late for school due to medical appointments will remain marked as absent. Medical marks are will be recorded as an M when the absences are administered by the Admin Assistant.

  • Afternoon registration will be taken at 1.00pm for Y1 and Y2, 1.30pm for Y3 and Y4 and 1.45pm for Y5 and Y6. Any child not present for the afternoon sessions must be reported to the school office immediately.

  • Reasons for absence are completed by the Admin Assistant and will correspond to the reason given by parents.

  • The school operates a 9.30am call system whereby the Admin Assistant overlooks the registers on a daily basis. A record is made of all the children who are absent. The Admin Assistant telephones the parents of the children concerned if a reason for the absence has not already been communicated to the school by letter, telephone or in person. This is then recorded and a note placed in the register to inform the class teacher. These notes are then used by the Admin Assistant to clear absences on the OMR absence register.

  • Authorised absence is when the parent or guardian of the child contacts the school by letter, phone, personal visit, stating a acceptable and valid reason for absence

  • Unauthorised absence is when no explanation for a child’s absence has been received from the parent or guardian after a reminder letter has been sent out OR when the EWO or Headteacher advices that the reason given is not a valid or reasonable excuse. Unauthorised absences are recorded as an O by the Admin Assistant.

Leave of Absence in Exceptional Circumstances in Term Time

At the beginning of the academic year 2009/10 Stoke-on-Trent City Council had as one of their top priorities the raising of pupils’ levels of attainment in all their schools. To achieve this parents are being asked not to take their children out of school for holidays during term-time. They are reminded that the law states that parents DO NOT have an automatic right to take their child out of school during this time.

Therefore the existing holiday form has been replaced with the ‘Leave of Absence in Exceptional Circumstances’ form, (this form is available from the school office). Headteachers are requested not to authorise the annual holiday requests, but to take into consideration an exceptional circumstance.

  • Parents who take children on an unauthorised holiday will be marked in the register with a ‘G’ (unauthorised family holiday).

  • Parents whose holiday request has been authorised, the child’s mark will be ‘H’ (authorised family holiday)

If any periods of absence are taken which are unauthorised, they will be recorded as such in the school’s attendance register. If there are any other periods of unauthorised absence parents may be issued with a penalty notice of £60 per child per parent/carer.

Monitoring Absences

Since September 2009 the school has introduced a colour code system to monitor children’s attendance, whereby each term letters are sent out to parents letting them know the percentage attendance for their child.

The coding system is as follows:-

Green Letters – 95% to 99.9%

Yellow Letters – 92% to 94.9%

Grey Letters – 85% to 91.9%

Orange Letters – 80% to 84.9%

Red Letters – Below 80%

Any child with 100% attendance receives a certificate during the end of term assembly.

  • The Education Welfare Officer visits the school every month. The Learning Mentor, Admin Assistant and Education Welfare Officer will view a percentage of attendance list and identify children whose attendance falls below 95% and of persistent late arrivals.

  • The Education Welfare Officer is provided with address and attendance details of children whose absence is causing concern. Home visits are made followed by official warning letters.

  • The Headteacher is informed of children whose attendance and lateness is giving cause for concern.

  • The Headteacher will meet with the EWO on a monthly basis

Absences for Religious Observation

In accordance with LEA guidelines the school allows 3 days per academic year for the celebration of the appropriate faith. Letters to remind parents of the 3 day allowance are sent out prior to the celebration period. These three days are marked R (Religious Observance) by the Admin Assistant. Any days exceeding these 3 days at the times of the celebrations will be marked as unauthorised (O).

Rewarding Good Attendance

The school recognises and celebrates good attendance on a weekly basis by;

  • Awarding a class with ‘Best Attendance’ at awards assembly every Friday afternoon. The children in the class that have 100% attendance for the week and have arrived in school on time every day are then put into a draw and two children are drawn out to receive a prize.

  • Parents are informed of the winning class via the weekly newsletter

  • Certificates are awarded to 100% attendance children at the end of every term

  • Prizes and certificates are awarded to 100% attendance children who have attended every day and never been late for the whole school year

Distribution & Collection of Registers

The following procedures will be followed in order that the registers are available in a central point in case of a fire or any other emergency:-

  • All registers must be returned to the school office after the morning and afternoon registration.

  • The registers central point is in the Secretary’s office on the desk. The OMR sheets are kept in a PVC folder with the class and teacher’s name clearly written on the front.

  • On a rota basis, children in Year 6 collect the register from the office at 8.40am for distribution. After the close of registration the registers are returned to the office by chosen members of the class.

  • At 12.45pm the registers are distributed by members of the Year 6 class for the afternoon session

  • In the event of a fire or other emergency the School Secretary will bring the registers with her when she evacuates the building. They are then distributed to each Class Teacher in order that all children can be accounted for.

Reviewed and Approved by Governors – May 2012

CHARGING AND REMISSIONS POLICY

THE NEWMAN CATHOLIC COLLEGIATE

 

CHARGING AND REMISSIONS POLICY

 

                                               

                                                                                                                     Contents

 

Page 1

1.    Aims

2.    Responsibilities

3.    Charging

4.    Residential Trips

5.    Materials, Ingredients & Textbooks

 

Page 2

6.    Music Tuition

7.    Swimming

8.    Uniform

9.    Exams

10.Nursery Fees

11. Charging for Optional Activities

 

Page 3

12.Activities Arranged by Third Parties

13.Charging for Transport During Academy Hours

14.Charging for Damaged or Lost Items

15.Voluntary Contributions

16. Lettings

17.Remissions

Charging and Remissions Policy

 

Aim

This charging policy has been compiled in line with DfE requirements and in accordance with the Education Act, 1996 and applies to all academies within the Newman Catholic Collegiate.

The aim of this policy is to set out what charges will be levied for academy activities, external lettings and extended  provision, what remissions will be implemented and the circumstances under which voluntary contributions will be requested from parents. Any exceptions for the individual academies are listed in separate appendices at the back of this policy.

The Board of Directors recognise the valuable contribution that a wide range of activities, including academy visits, clubs and residential experiences, can make towards all aspects of pupils’ education.

 

Responsibilities

The Board of Directors are responsible for determining the content of the policy and the principal for implementation. Any determinations with respect to individual parents will be considered by the principal who will inform the chair of the Academy Committee. The Board of Directors are required by law to draw up a charges and remission policy and this should be made available to parents/guardians.

 

Charging

·         Charging is permitted for education provided out of academy hours, unless it is within the requirements of the National Curriculum or to fulfil statutory duties relating to religious education when only charges for lodging, board or residential trips can be made.

·         Charges must be remitted for board and lodgings to students whose parents receive family credit or income support, if the activity takes place during academy hours or is covered by the criteria relating to national curriculum or religious provision.

·         The Board can chose to remit charges in whole or part.

·         Voluntary contributions may be requested for any activity provided it is clear that there is no obligation to contribute and that there will be no differentiations between those pupils who contribute and those you do not.

·         Under certain circumstances a third party may charge parents direct for activities organised in academy hours.

 

Residential trips

Parents will be notified in advance of any such activities which the academy proposes to organise and the estimated cost. Parental consent must obtained for these activities.

·         Essential. For residential trips which are essential to the National Curriculum, statutory RE or in preparation for prescribed examinations, a charge will be levied for board and lodging.

·         Non-essential. For residential trips which are not essential to the National Curriculum, statutory RE or in preparation for prescribed examinations a charge will be levied up to the full cost of the trip including contingency and academy administrative costs.

·         Academy trips are funded through parents paying online or via cheque or cash to the finance office or reception.

 

The board of directors can remit any charges for board and lodging for pupils whose parents are in receipt of family credit or income support where the activity takes place in academy hours, or if it is our of hours relating to the National Curriculum or religious education.

Any other remission arrangements for particular activities or pupils will be at the discretion of the academy committee and principal.

 

Materials, Ingredients & Textbooks

·         Where a pupil or parent wishes to retain items produced as a result of art, craft and design, or design and technology, a charge may be levied for the cost of the materials used. In the case of Food Technology, pupils usually provide their own ingredients, but if the pupil forgets, the academy provides the ingredients and levies a charge. Textbooks are provided free of charge, but in some subjects, additional revision guides are available, for which a charge is made.

·         If a pupil loses or defaces their textbook a charge may be levied to cover the cost of replacement.

Music Tuition

·         Parental agreement must be obtained before students are given tuition outside the curriculum.

·         Tuition may not be charged for whether or not the tuition takes place within academy time if the activity is provided to fulfil the requirements of:

1.     The National Curriculum

2.     Statutory duties relating to religious education

 

Swimming

The Primary Academies within the collegiate organise swimming lessons for pupils. The lessons take place in school time and are part of the National Curriculum. The collegiate make no charge for this activity and parents are informed when these take place.

 

Uniform

Uniform is sold at the academy or from the School Uniform shop. All uniform sold at the academy is sold at cost to parents.

 

Exams

A charge will be incurred for a re-sit of an AS level or A level exam. This charge will be at cost and in line with the examination board charges.

 

Nursery Charges

Each primary academy within the collegiate has a nursery and charges on an individual basis. Please refer to each academies website for information on nursery charges.

 

Charging for Optional Activities

Activities held outside academy hours – these will sometimes include day and residential experiences. Charges may be made for these activities except where they are provided to fulfil statutory duties relating to the National Curriculum or to religious education, in which case they are not regarded as optional extras. (Board and Lodging charges will be applied in accordance with any remission arrangements).

 

Parents will be notified in advance of any ‘optional extras’ which the academy proposes to organise and the estimated cost. Parental consent will be obtained if their children are to participate in any activities for which a charge may be made.

 

The activity charges will depend on the type of activity and its cost. The charge will not exceed the actual cost of providing the activity and will be divided equally between the numbers of pupils participating. It can include a subsidy for those parents who cannot pay the charge. The charge may include the following elements;

 

·         Travel costs

·         Board and lodging costs

·         Materials/equipment

·         Entrance fees e.g. theatres

·         Breakfast/Nursery club

·         Snacks at break-time

·         After school club

·         Minibus Hire

·         Visitors delivering workshops to the pupils

 

Costs of staff can only be included if they are employed by the Board of Directors specifically for this activity or they are staff already employed by the Board of Directors and have been given a separate contract for this activity.

 

Any remission arrangements will be at the discretion of the Academy Committee.

 

 

 

Activities Arranged by Third Parties

Any activities arranged by a third party can be charged for e.g. sports club. Where visits fall into this category, a charge will be applied. It is the collegiate policy that no child be excluded on financial grounds and this will continue with remission arrangements.

 

Charging for Transport during Academy Hours

Transport provided for students during academy hours for an activity provided by the academy or for transporting students between split sites cannot be charged to the parents.

 

Parents may be required to cover the cost of transport where their child is traveling from home to an activity sanctioned by the Academy but not provided by them.

 

Charging for Damaged or Lost Items

The academy may charge parents for the cost to replace items broken, damaged or lost if it is due to student behaviour. Approval from the Academy Committee must be sought.

In the event of persistent bad student behaviour resulting in further damage to academy property and significant cost this must be referred to the board of directors.

 

Voluntary Contributions

Parents can make voluntary contributions for the benefit of the academy or in support of any academy activity, whether during or outside academy hours. Any contributions sought will be entirely voluntary and pupils will be treated equally regardless of whether their parents make a contribution.

 

Lettings

Prices for charging will be reviewed annually by the Business Manager and approved by the Academy Committee. The Resources and Services subcommittee will review these charges every year in line with any benchmarking activity. Charges should take account of a caretaker fee and a proportion of energy costs.

 

Remissions

The Principal and Academy Committee may remit in full or part charges in respect of a pupil, if they feel it is reasonable to do so.

 

The Principal and Academy Committee may decide not to levy charges in respect of a particular activity, if it feels it is reasonable in the circumstances.

 

Evidence must be available to the Board of Directors on request to show clear reasons and discussions around these decisions.

Health and Safety

St Wilfrid’s

Health and Safety Policy

The policy has 4 parts;

Part 1- The Health and Safety Policy Statement

Part 2- Information on organisingfor health and safety and the responsibilities of key

              people within the school.

Part 3- The detailed arrangements & procedures in place for Health, Safety and

              Welfare

Part 4– Key Performance Indicators which should be collated to ensure that health

              and safety performance is monitored.

 

 

Health and Safety Policy Statement

St Wilfrid’s

 

1.            This policy statement records the school’s organisation and arrangements for health and safety.

2.            The requirement to provide a safe and healthy working environment for all employees is acknowledged and the Academy Committee and those in control of the school recognise and take responsibility for compliance with the statutory duties under the Health and Safety at Work etc Act 1974.

3.            In compliance with the Health and Safety at Work etc. Act, this schools Academy Committee will ensure so far as is reasonably practicable that:

-     all places and premises where staff and pupils are required to work and engage in school activities are maintained in a condition which is safe and without risk to health.(This includes the health and safety of persons on school premises or taking part in school activities elsewhere.)

-     all plant and equipment is safe to use and that arrangements exist for the safe use, handling and storage of articles and substances at work.

-     appropriate safe systems of work exist and are maintained.

-     sufficient information, instruction, training and supervision is available and provided to ensure that staff and pupils can avoid hazards and contribute in a positive manner towards their own health and safety and others.

-     a healthy working environment is maintained including adequate welfare facilities.

4.         In addition to the above the school will ensure that so far as is reasonably practicable that the health and safety of non employees is not adversely affected by its’ activities.

5.         Employee involvement is an important part of managing safely, and consultation on health and safety with employees and employee representatives forms part of this policy.

6.         This policy statement and the accompanying organisational arrangements supersede any previously issued.  

 

Peter Kelly

 

Mark Barlow

 

Part 2

Health, Safety and Welfare Policy – Organisation and Responsibility

 

Overall responsibility for health and safety in schools rests with the employer.  Who the employer is, depends upon the type of school.

 

Type of School

Who is the Employer?

Comments

Academy

 

 

The Academy Committee.

 

NOTE.  Where County Council employed staff are working on these premises (e.g. cleaning staff) the County Council has responsibility for their health and safety.

 

Regardless of anything stated above, all school Academy Committees have health and safety responsibility as the occupier of the premises.

Headteachers must make arrangements for ensuring the implementation of the health and safety policies of their employer and/or any Academy Committee arrangements arising out of their health and safety responsibilities.

The County Council’s delegation scheme includes provision to ensure that schools meet their health and safety responsibilities and that necessary work is carried out.

 

Organisation and Responsibilities for Health, Safety and Welfare

 

Duties and responsibilities for health and safety have been assigned to Staff and   Local Academy Committee  Representatives based upon the following roles

 

Policy-makers 

Devise and produce policy on health, safety and welfare at a strategic level.

Preserve, develop, promote and maintain the School’s and the Council’s health and safety management system.

Ensure that health and safety matters are taken into account when organisational decisions are made.

Planners

Develop the local plans to achieve corporate/school health & safety objectives. Develop management arrangements

for the identification of hazards and control of risks within their area

Implementers

Ensure that workplace precautions and safe systems of work are developed in order to identify hazards and control risks. Ensure all the systems are working effectively

Assisters

Have the authority, independence and competence to advise Directors, Managers and Employees (or their representatives). They may also be technical or specialist employees who have achieved a certain level of health and safety competency within their specialised field

Employees

Irrespective of their position within the County Councils structure, everyone is regarded as an employee and therefore the employee duties within the H&S Policy apply to them.

 

Management Model of the Policy-makers, Planners, Implementers, Assisters and Employees in schools?

 

 

Policy-makers

Planners

Implementers

Assisters

Employees

  Local Academy Committee  Representatives

X

X

 

 

 

Headteacher

 

X

X

X

 

X

School Leadership Team

 

X

X

 

X

Deputy/Assistant Headteachers

 

X

X

 

X

Health and Safety Coordinator

 

X

 

X

X

Heads of Key stages

 

X

x

 

X

Teachers

 

 

x

 

X

Managers

 

X

X

 

X

Premises Managers

 

X

X

 

X

Teaching and Classroom Assistants

 

 

X

 

X

Learning Support Staff

 

 

X

 

X

Admin Staff

 

 

X

 

X

Site Supervisor or Caretaker

 

 

X

 

X

Council Health and Safety Policy Group

X

 

 

X

X

Health and Safety Adviser

X

 

 

X

X

County Council Officers e.g.

People Directorate Staff

Occupational Health Staff

Specialist Technical staff

HR Adviser

 

 

 

x

X

 

 

The responsibilities of Policy Makers, Planners, Implementers, Assisters and Employees within the Policy

 

Policy-makers

  Local Academy Committee  Representatives

Headteacher

H&S Policy Group

H&S Advisers

Devise and produce policy on health, safety and welfare at a strategic level.

Preserve, develop, promote and maintain the School’s and the Council’s health and safety management system.

Ensure that health and safety matters are taken into account when organisational decisions are made.

 

The Policy makers;

 

·      Will be familiar with the overall responsibilities laid down for Policy Makers in the County Council Health, Safety and Welfare Policy.

·      Must ensure that the school has a structure in place to manage health and safety which includes; planning, implementation of these plans, monitoring, and reviewing and auditing. This must be integrated into general day to day management.

·      Will ensure that plans for continuous improvement in health and safety management are developed and reviewed regularly.

·      Must ensure that all school activities are organised and have sufficient arrangements and resources; to ensure that health and safety can be managed effectively.

 

As Policy Makers the Academy Committee;

 

·      Must ensure that those who have been assigned specific responsibilities in school for H&S have been identified, this has been communicated, and adequate training or instruction has been given.

·      Must ensure that sufficient competent persons are in place to advise the school on H&S issues.

·      Will set H&S targets (with Planners) to improve H&S performance.

·      Is required to monitor that the H&S targets are being met and the school is meeting health and safety obligations by checking that policies and procedures are implemented in accordance with requirements, and by reviewing Key Performance Indicators (KPI) of health and safety performance on a regular basis. 

-   Some annual KPIs are required by the County Council, the Academy also identify other indicators they wish to monitor.

-   The H&S Coordinator may be delegated the responsibility to collate these KPI’s on the Headteachers’ behalf (see Assisters below)

·      Seek advice from and receive reports from the County Council H&S Advisers and their School H&S Coordinator as appropriate and take actions as necessary.

·      Ensure that the auditing of H&S takes place and that action plans are developed as a result of audit.

·      The   LOCAL ACADEMY COMMITTEE   will ensurethat all their decisions reflect the commitment of this policy and promote a positive culture towards health, safety and welfare issues.

·      The   LOCAL ACADEMY COMMITTEE   will inform the Children and Lifelong Learning Directorate of any issue which has significant health and safety implications which cannot be resolved satisfactorily without their support and involvement.

 

Planners

Headteacher

Members of the School Leadership Team

  Local Academy Committee  Representatives

Deputy/Assistant Headteacher

Health and Safety Coordinator

Heads of Key Stages

Premises Manager

Develop the local plans to achieve corporate/school health & safety objectives. Develop management arrangements

for the identification of hazards and control of risks within their area

 

The Planners will;

 

·      Be familiar with the overall responsibilities laid down for Planners in the County Council Health, Safety and Welfare Policy.

·      Take overall responsibility for the day to day health and safety management of the school and school activities taking place outside school premises.

·      Determine the resources and arrangements needed to manage health and safety effectively as part of the school planning process.

·      Delegate duties to other members of staff any or all of the duties associated with the management of health and safety. (It is clearly understood by everyone concerned that the delegation of certain duties will not relieve the Headteacher from the overall day to day responsibilities for health and safety within the establishment.)

·      As part of their management of health and safety;

-   appoint a Premises Manager (see Implementers below)

-   identify a member of staff who can act as a Health and Safety Coordinator (see Assisters below)

·      Ensure that these staff receives appropriate H&S training.

·      Ensure that all staff within the school is aware of their responsibilities with regard to Health and Safety issues. Where staff have specific duties in health and safety matters (e.g. First Aid/Fire Marshal), this should be identified clearly to everyone in the premises.

·      Keep up to date with changes or updates in health and safety management by using the County Council or other resources and communications.

·      Ensure that suitable and sufficient training, instruction and information is provided when required

·      Set health and safety objectives as part of the school planning process.

·      Include health and safety in staff objectives where appropriate and assess their performance against these objectives regularly.

·      Advise   Local Academy Committee  Representatives of the resources and arrangements needed to manage health and safety effectively as part of the school planning process.

·      Communicate any health and safety actions outlined in the school planning process to relevant staff and   Local Academy Committee  Representatives.

·      Develop management arrangementsfor the identification of hazards and control of risks (risk assessments), ensure these take place and that results are communicated to staff.

·      Develop local policies and procedures as necessary for health and safety and ensure they reflect the overall CC Policy.

·      Seek help from the CC H&S Adviser or other specialist to ensure that H&S Policy can be implemented effectively and advise the   LOCAL ACADEMY COMMITTEE   and/or the County Council (as necessary) where issues arise which cannot be managed at a local level, need additional resources or require external support.

·      Ensure that an annual Premises H&S Evaluation (inspection) of the premises is carried out, in line with the County Council Audit arrangements. (This duty may be delegated to other members of school staff)

·      Ensure that an Annual Self Audit of the management of H&S is carried out, in line with the County Council Audit arrangements. (This duty may be shared with other staff such as SLT)

·      Draw up any Action Plans required from the results of the Premises H&S Evaluation and Annual Self Audit and monitor these regularly.

·      Take part in and cooperate with any Internal Health and Safety Audit which may be carried out by the County H&S Team.

·      Advise the   Local academy Committee

·      Academy Committeeand others of the results of any H&S monitoring (including KPI information) which takes place and of any actions required as a result of this.

·      Consult with staff as necessary on matters of health and safety which may affect them at work.

 
Health and Safety Committee

 

The school may chose to establish a Health and Safety Committee which should meet regularly to consider health and safety planning and organisation, the implementation of policies and to review and monitor performance.  Where Health and safety is integrated into the strategic planning meetings of the school a separate meeting may not be required. It is recommended that H&S is a regular agenda item in these meetings.

An annual report to the Academy Committee outlining achievements against the H&S plan and annual KPI’s should be considered by Planners and Implementers, the school’s Health and Safety Coordinator may be responsible for collating this information (seeAssisters) for their consideration. As a minimum, the report will contain a summary of accident and ill health statistics for the current year and will suggest health and safety targets and priorities for the forthcoming year.

 

Implementers

Headteacher (also Policy maker, Planner)

School Leadership Team (also planners)

Heads of Department (who may also be planners)

Teaching Staff [Including supply teachers] 

Managers

Premises Managers

Teaching Assistants

Learning Support Staff

Admin Staff

Site Supervisor/Caretaker

Ensure that workplace precautions and safe systems of work are developed in order to identify hazards and control risks. Ensure all the systems are working effectively

 

The Implementers will;

 

·      Maintain an understanding of the Health and Safety Policies of the County Council and those developed within school

·      Demonstrate commitment to the management of health and safety by:

-   Setting a good example to others

-   Promoting good practice

-   Identifying H&S problems and rectifying them if possible

-   Challenging poor H&S performance or attitudes

-   Communicating regularly about H&S

·      Be responsible for and take the lead on implementation of health and safety policies and any arrangements which have been developed by the Policy makers and Planners.

·      Understand and own the plans in place for H&S as part of the overall school planning process monitor progress in these areas and advise planners of the results or any deficiencies.

·      Ensure than any personal targets set by Planners are achieved, feedback any issues identified in this process.

·      Ensure that individuals have health and safety objectives as part of their annual review process (these may reflect the overall H&S plans)

·      Encourage participation in H&S and ensure that communication about H&S issues takes place.

·      Assess new and existing work activities for hazards, ensuring that risk assessments are in place, control measures implemented (safe methods of work/Personal Protective Equipment etc) and the results of risk assessments communicated.

·      Ensure that, where responsibilities for health and safety have been delegated to staff members, these roles are properly assigned and understood by employees in their teams/areas.

·      Ensure that staff in these roles have received appropriate training.

·      Ensure that there is sufficient information, instruction and training and resources available for staff in order for them to do their job

·      Consult with staff as necessary on matters of health and safety which may affect them at work and receive health and safety reports from Health and Safety Representatives, responding as necessary.

·      Supervise work adequately to ensure that good health and safety standards are maintained.

·      Ensure that adequate monitoring of H&S takes place e.g. by taking part on Premises H&S Evaluations and carrying out own inspection of work areas.

·      Carry out any reactive monitoring required such as investigation of accidents, near misses and occupational illness and ensure the information gained is used to improve H&S in the future.

·      Avoid allocating “blame” to individuals who report accidents, illness or near misses, and ensure that all reports of this nature are managed effectively.

·      Monitor H&S standards at the local level by retaining statistics to identify patterns and trends in events.

·      Seek advice from the CC H&S Adviser or other specialist as required.

·      Make use of other resources provided by the County Council to promote H&S at work (e.g. intranet/Newsletters)

·      In addition to the above, Teaching staff are responsible for the health and safety of all pupils under their control whilst involved in organised work activities both on site e.g. classrooms, laboratories, workshops etc., and off site e.g. school trips. 

 

Premises Managers

In addition to the responsibilities above Premises Managers have specific duties laid down in the County Council Health, Safety and Welfare policy. These are reproduced here;

 

1.      To maintain an understanding of County Council health and safety policy arrangements and the premise manager responsibilities detailed within them, and an awareness of relevant premise related health and safety legislation, issues and procedures and operating within these requirements;

2.      To control contractors working on the premises, and ensure that hazard information has been exchanged and suitable risk control measures implemented;

3.      Ensuring adequate security arrangements are maintained;

4.      Ensuring the general cleanliness of the premises and that adequate welfare facilities are provided;

5.      Arranging for regular inspection of the areas of the premises for which they are responsible to monitor that workplace health and safety standards are in effective working order and that a safe means of  access and egress is maintained;

6.      Ensuring that adequate fire safety arrangements and emergency procedures are implemented and maintained;

7.      Ensuring that plant and equipment is adequately maintained;

8.      Arranging for the regular testing and maintenance of electrical equipment;

9.      Maintaining records of plant and equipment maintenance, tests, fire evacuation drills, fire officer inspections and fire extinguisher maintenance;

10.   Ensuring adequate first aid requirements for the premises are formally assessed and adequate provision is made;

11.   Ensuring that all premise related hazards are adequately identified, assessed and suitable and sufficient control measures implemented and monitored;

12.   Undertaking thorough investigation of all premise related accidents/incidents. Ensure the availability of an accident book at each premise ;

13.   Ensuring the adequate provision of health and safety notices and warning signs are prominently displayed and comply with the Health and Safety (Safety Signs and Signals) Regulations;

14.   Ensuring that a copy of the Health and Safety Law Poster is displayed in an accessible location and the information on the poster kept up to date;

15.   Maintaining a health and safety file on the premises in relation to any construction work covered by the Construction (Design and Maintenance) Regulations and make this available to contractors upon requests;

16.   Ensuring that adequate systems are in place for the management of asbestos and control of legionella and excessive water temperatures;

17.   To respond promptly to ‘D1 Notifications’ that is notification of a defect that could affect the health and safety of building occupants/visitors, informed to them by County Property Services as a result of a maintenance contact visit.

 

Assisters

Health and Safety Coordinators

Health and Safety Advisors

Occupational Health Professionals

Specialist Technical Staff

Have the authority, independence and competence to advise Directors, Managers and Employees (or their representatives).
They may also be technical or specialist employees who have achieved a certain level of health and safety competency within their specialised field

 

Assisters act in a supportive role to managers and may use their authority, independence and competence to advise when required to do so

The Health and Safety Coordinator;

·      Is familiar with the responsibilities of Assisters laid down in the County Council Health, Safety and Welfare Policy.

·      Has the core duty to ensure that there is a system established for the management of health and safety – this planning and organisation must take place with the Planner(s) and Policy makers as necessary.

·      Will keep up to date with Health and Safety issues and changes by making use of resources provided by the County Council to promote H&S at work (e.g. intranet/Newsletters)

·      May take on certain functions such as communication, collation of statistics, coordination of H&S Evaluation/Audits as directed, but the overall responsibility rests with the Head of Establishment.

·      May collate and produce an annual report on Health and Safety performance including essential KPIs (see Part 4) for Academy Committees to view as part of their monitoring process. A template is available for this on the  SLN/Health and safety Intranet site at http://education.staffordshire.gov.uk/SchoolAdministration/HS/KeyDocuments/

 

Employees

Irrespective of their position within the County Councils structure, everyone is regarded as an employee and therefore the employee duties within the H&S Policy apply to them.

 

Employees [including temporary & volunteers]

 

Employees – Irrespective of their position within the County Councils structure,

All staff are employees and therefore all the employee responsibilities within the County Council Health, Safety and Welfare Policy apply to everyone.All employees in the establishment are aware if the responsibilities of Employees laid down in the County Council Health, Safety and Welfare Policy.

 

All employees have general health and safety responsibilities both under criminal and civil law.  Staff must be aware that they are obliged to take care of their own safety and health whilst at work along with that of others who may be affected by their actions.

 

Employees must also co-operate with the Academy Committee and senior management of the school so that they may fulfil any legal requirements placed on them as employers and/or persons in control of premises. 

 

Pupils/students [This section should be drawn to attention of all pupils]

 

All pupils must be encouraged to follow all safe working practices and observe all school safety rules. 

All pupils will:
 

·      follow all instructions issued by any member of staff in the case of an emergency;

·      ensure that they do not intentionally or recklessly interfere with equipment provided for safety purposes e.g. fire extinguishers etc.

·      inform any member of staff of any situation which may affect their safety.

 

Staff Safety Representatives

 

Health and safety at work law provides for the appointment of trade union appointed safety representatives from amongst the employees.  Where the Academy Committee is notified in writing of such an appointment, the safety representative shall have the following functions:

 

·      to investigate potential hazards and to examine the causes of accidents in the workplace;

·      to investigate complaints by any employee he represents relating to that employees health and safety or welfare at work;

·      to make representations to the Headteacher via the Deputy Headteacher on general matters affecting the health, safety and welfare of employees;

·      to carry out workplace health, safety and welfare inspections;

·      to attend any safety committee meetings;

·      to co-operate with employers in promoting health and safety at work.

None of the above functions given to a safety representative impose any legal duty or liability whatsoever on that person.  A safety representative is in no way obliged to carry out any or all of the above functions.

 

Part 3

Arrangements & Procedures for Health, Safety and Welfare

St Wilfrid’s Academy

The following procedures and arrangements have been established within our school to eliminate or reduce health and safety risks to an acceptable level and to comply with minimum legal requirements:

 

1.            Accident Reporting, Recording & Investigation

                        Accidents are initially reported to the Head or Deputy Head

 

2.            Asbestos

The site manager is responsible for liaison for any matter involving asbestos or records relating to

 

3.            Contractors

Contractors are to report to the site manager after signing in at the office who will ensure compliance with safety arrangements. If contractors arrive before the office is open they are to be supervised by the site manager or a member of the SMT

 

4.            Curriculum Safety  [including out of school learning activity/study support]

·         Staff will refer to the Educational visits policy regarding any off site activity

·          For on site activities staff will refer to the risk assessments stored on the Learning Platform for the schools risk assessments. If needing to add or edit risk assessment to  liaise with the D/H or SMT

·         Subject leaders will ensure Risk Assessments are current and inplace for their subjects i.e. Science and PE and staff are informed of any health and safety publications adopted by the school  which staff must be familiar with e.g. “Safety in PE”]

 

5.            Drugs & Medications

 

Administering Medication in School

 

Staff may administer medicine to children during the school day following the procedures as follows;

 

  • All medication must be accompanied with a letter from the parent/guardian giving permission for the medicine to be given together with the dosage and the times of day that the medicine is to be administered.  This letter must be signed by the parent/guardian.
  • All medications must be stored in the locked medicine storage unit located in the Office Manager’s office.
  • Any medication given must be logged by the staff member giving the medicine and countersigned by another staff member.  These records are stored in the green file next to the medicine cabinet.

 

When children have specific medical problems, eg diabetes, the school must be provided with a care plan to follow.  In such cases training will be organized for staff directly involved with the care of the child during the school day

6.            Electrical Equipment [fixed & portable]

Inspected by user, subject leaders if applicable, Site manager catering, cleaning  and PFI contractors as required. Personal electronic items are not to be used in school.

 

7.            Fire Precautions & Procedures [and other emergencies incl. bomb threats]

A member of the SLT with the assistance of the site manager will,  under the supervision of the Headteacher,l review fire risk assessment, frequency and arrangement of drills, procedures to be followed, staff with special responsibilities e.g. fire marshal etc, assembly points, maintenance of fire exits escape routes, maintenance of fire extinguishers, staff training, calling the fire service, testing the fire alarm, emergency lighting etc.

 

8.            First Aid

Staff will refer to the current first aid policy available on the   Learning Platform

 

9.            Glass & Glazing

All glass in doors, side panels to be safety glass, all replacement glass to be of safety standard, assessment of premises to establish whether there are areas which are unsuitable for use by children due to glass being of low standard to be undertaken by PFI co-ordinating with site manager .

 

10.          Hazardous Substances (COSHH)

To be listed and  supervised by site manager

 

11.          Health and Safety Advice

Available from the Health & Safety Team, Children and Lifelong Learning Directorate, Staffordshire County Council, tel: 01785-278855, Occupational Health Unit, etc.]

 

12.          Housekeeping, cleaning & waste disposal

The responsibility of the staff member using the area supported by the cleaning team.

 

13.          Handling & Lifting

Training to be arranged with Staffs Health and safety

14.          Jewellery

As laid out in the home school agreement,

 

15.          Lettings/shared use of premises

As per letting policy available on Learning Platfrom.

16.          Lone Working

As per Lone working Risk Assessment available on Learning Platfrom.

17.          Maintenance / Inspection of Equipment (including selection of equipment)

               Site manager and PFI contractors as applicable

18.          Monitoring the Policy and results

 bi-annual H&S checklist, designated member of the SMT

 Other checks or workplace inspections to monitor implementation of policy by staff, designated member of the SMT

PFI checks as per contacts

monitoring accident reports/trends, complaints.aqnd  the implementation of new and updated policies, designated member of the SMT

 Health and safety performance is measured by termly reports to Academey committee

 

19.     Poster on Health and Safety Law

            designated member of the SMT

 

20.          Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

[Selection of equipment which is suitable, arrangements for periodic checking and maintenance of equipment, ensuring proper use, supervision, PPE to be provided free of charge where risk assessment determines to be necessary]

 

21.          Reporting Defects

Staff to report to

·         Site Manager

·         designated member of the SMT (Staff to use Employee Hazard Form HSF 42 and give to D. Stuart).

·         Member of SMT(Staff to use Employee Hazard Form HSF 42 and give to D. Stuart).

·         Subject leader with responsibility for specific material.

 

22.          Risk Assessments

Risk assessments are managed by the D. Averill via the office using the evolve system.

Standing Risk Assessments are on the Learning Platform.

 

23.          School Trips/ Off-Site Activities

            Educational Visits co-ordinator Mrs Manifold

            Evolve Lead D.H

 

24.          School Transport – e.g. minibuses

The school has insured staff cars for business use and makes use of commercial coaches for any other transportation.

 

25.          Smoking

The school has a no smoking policy

26.          Staff Consultation and Communication

Staff are informed via:

·          access to the Learning Platform

·         Staff meetings

·         Staff representatives at the Academy meetings

·         Staff notice board

 

27.          Stress and staff Well-being

School and county arrangements are in place for supporting staff

 

28.          Supervision [including out of school learning activity/study support]

. pupils must not be left unattended at  all  times when in the care of the school,,

 ratios for school trips are displayed in the staff room

Extended school tutors and activity leaders are supervised  by the Extended school lead to ensure correct supervision of pupils.

 

 

29.          Training and Development

Induction for new staff

Policies and guidance available via the learning platform.

30.          Use of VDU’s / Display Screens / DSE

            Training to be arranged

31.          Vehicles on Site

Policy to be collated

32.          Violence to Staff / School Security

As per policy on Learning platform

 

33.          Working at Height

Staff have access to kick steps for higher work, Step ladders are not to be used as lone workers ,training to be arranged.

34.         Water Hygiene

[Arrangements for ensuring water hygiene samples and checks take place as required by the premises Water Hygiene Manual,  is the responsibly of the site manager Co-ordinating with PFI

 

36.       Work Experience

As per the Work experience policy on the learning platform

 

 

 

 

Local Health and Safety Key Performance Indicators (KPI’s)

 

It is important that managers can monitor the health and safety performance of their premises in order to determine where progress is being made and where further actions and resources may be required.

 

 

Signed by the Chair of Governor………………………………………………………………………

 

Date:………………..

 

School KPI’s may be added here

Training for Ladders and VDUs

Policy for vehicles on Site

HS bi annual check

 

Indicate how these will be monitored here

Academy Committee review

 

STAFF SIGNATURE LIST

 

I confirm that I have read St. Wilfrid’s Catholic Academy Health and Safety Policy.

 

 

 

NAME

SIGNATURE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Complaints Procedure

St. Wilfrid's Complaints Procedure


1. RATIONALE
1.1 Catholic schools aim to be places where love of one’s neighbour is obvious at all times. As St. John reports, Christ said to His disciples at the Last Supper “This is my commandment, that you love one another, as I have loved you”.
1.2 Catholic schools are staffed by teachers who are not only qualified and expert in their own field but who also, having freely chosen to become teachers in a Catholic institution, commit themselves to care for and help children in every way possible consistent with Catholic doctrine, principles and the Catholic ethos of the school. Nevertheless, as in any organisation, parents may from time to time raise a concern.
1.3 The main purposes of the complaints procedure are:

  • to resolve problems;

  • to give parents a means to raise issues of concern and have them addressed.

2. GENERAL PRINCIPLES
2.1 Initial concerns
2.1.1 The underlying principle is that concerns ought to be handled, if at all possible, without the need for formal procedures.
2.1.2 In most cases a staff member will receive the first approach, as an expression of concern and it will be resolved.
2.2 Formal procedures
2.2.1 The Governing Body’s complaints procedure does not replace the arrangements for dealing with certain types of complaint that fall outside the remit of the Governing Body’s complaints procedure. A number of other procedures already exist:

  • Admissions Procedures;

  • Child Protection Procedures;

  • Curriculum Complaints Procedures;

  • Staff Grievance and Disciplinary Procedures;

  • Exclusions Procedures;

  • Special Educational Needs Procedures;

  • Procedures for querying public examination results.

2.2.2 Formal procedures only need to be invoked when initial attempts to resolve the issue are unsuccessful and the person raising concerns remains dissatisfied and wishes to take the matter further.
2.2.3 The member of staff with responsibility for the operation and management of the school complaints procedure is known as the school’s ‘complaints co-ordinator’.
2.2.4 Where the first approach is made to a governor, the next step would be to refer the complainant to the appropriate person and advise them about the procedure. It would be useful if governors did not act unilaterally on an individual complaint outside the formal procedure or be involved at the early stages in case they are needed to sit on a panel at a later stage of the procedure.


3. THE FORMAL COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE
3.1 Stage One - complaint heard by complaints co-ordinator
3.1.1 The complaints co-ordinator will seek to resolve the complaint by meeting with the complainant and investigating the complaint. This will be done with reference to the ‘Guidelines for the Implementation of the Model Complaints Procedure’.
3.1.2 Where the complaint concerns the headteacher, the complaints co-ordinator can refer the complaint to the chair of governors. The chair (or nominee) will then conduct Stage One.
3.1.3 Within 5 working days of the complaints meeting, the complaints co-ordinator (or other person who conducted the Stage One meeting), will send to the complainant a written ‘Note of Meeting’. This will summarise the conclusions reached and inform the complainant that they may appeal the conclusions (i.e. take the complaint to Stage Two) if they wish, but if so must do so within 10 days of the Stage One meeting.


3.2 Stage Two - complaint heard by governing body’s complaints appeal panel
3.2.1 The complainant needs to write to the clerk of governors giving details of the complaint. A complaints form is available from the school for this purpose.
3.2.2 The clerk will convene a governing body complaints appeal panel.
3.2.3 The governors’ appeal hearing is the last school-based stage of the complaints procedure, and is not convened to merely rubber-stamp previous decisions.
3.2.4 Individual complaints will not be heard by the whole governing body at any stage, as this could compromise the impartiality of any panel set up under any other procedure.
3.2.5 The panel may consist of between three and five members of the governing body, but the headteacher should not be a member of this panel, which must be independent and seen to be impartial. The panel should elect their own chair.


3.3 Remit of the Complaints Appeal Panel
3.3.1 The panel can:

  • dismiss the complaint in whole or in part:

  • uphold the complaints in whole or in part;

  • decide on the appropriate action to be taken to resolve the complaint;

  • recommend changes to the school’s systems or procedures to ensure that problems of a similar nature do not recur.

3.3.2 It is important that the appeal hearing is independent and impartial and that it is seen to be so. No governor may sit on the panel if they have had a prior involvement in the complaint or in the circumstances surrounding it.
3.3.3 The aim of the hearing, which will be held in private, will be to resolve the complaint, where appropriate, and achieve reconciliation between school and the complainant. However, it is recognised that the complainant might not be satisfied with the outcome if the hearing does not find in their favour.
3.3.4 The panel will acknowledge that many complainants feel nervous and inhibited in a formal setting. The panel chair will ensure that the proceedings are as welcome as possible. Care will be taken to ensure that the layout of the room is informal and not adversarial in tone.
3.3.5 Governors sitting on the panel will have been informed about the school’s complaints procedure and Diocesan Schools Commission guidance regarding its implementation.


3.4 Roles and responsibilities
3.4.1 The school will ensure the panel meeting will be clerked. The role of the clerk will be to:

  • Ensure all parties have copies of the procedure.

  • set the date (within 20 working days), time and venue of the hearing, ensuring that the dates are convenient to all parties and that the venue and proceedings are accessible;

  • Collect any written evidence or other documentation for use at the hearing and names of any witnesses from all parties 10 working days in advance of the hearing;

  • collate all written material and send it to the parties 5 working days in advance of the hearing;

  • meet and welcome the parties as they arrive at the hearing;

  • record the proceedings;

  • notify all the parties of the panel’s decision, within 5 working days after the hearing

3.4.2 The role of the chair of the panel will be to ensure:

  • The remit of the panel is explained to the parties and each party has the opportunity to put their case without undue interruption;

  • the issues are addressed;

  • parents and others who may not be used to speaking at such a hearing are put at their ease;

  • the hearing is conducted in an informal manner with each party treating the other with respect and courtesy;

  • the panel is open minded and acting independently;

  • no member of the panel has a vested interest in the outcome of the proceedings or any involvement in an earlier stage of the procedure;

  • each side is given the opportunity to state their case and ask questions;

  • written material has been supplied by all parties;

  • if a related issue arises at the hearing it would be useful to give all parties the opportunity to adjourn to consider the related issue and then comment on it;

  • new issues raised in the hearing should be dealt with separately from this panel meeting.

3.5 Checklist for panel hearing
3.5.1 The panel will take account of the following points:

  • the hearing is as informal as possible;

  • witnesses are only required to attend for the part of the hearing in which they give their evidence.

  • after introductions, the complainant is invited to explain their complaint, and be followed by their witnesses.

  • the headteacher may question both the complainant and the witnesses after each has spoken.

  • the headteacher is then invited to explain the school’s actions and be followed by the school’s witnesses;

  • the complainant may question both the headteacher and the witnesses after each has spoken;

  • the panel may ask questions at any point;

  • the complainant is then invited to sum up their complaint;

  • the headteacher is invited to sum up the school’s actions and response to the complaint;

  • both parties leave together while the panel decides on the issues;

  • the chair explains that both parties will hear from the panel within a set time scale (5 working days).

3.6 Notification of the panel’s decision
3.6.1 The chair of the panel will ensure that the complainant is notified of the panel’s decision, in writing, with reasons clearly defined in plain English, within 5 working days of the meeting.
3.6.2 If any clarification concerning the letter is required the complainant may seek further advice from the chair of the panel.
3.6.3 In case the complainant is not satisfied that the complaints procedures were conducted properly and fairly, the letter will explain there is a further right to request an investigation by applying to the Director of Schools at the Diocesan Schools Commission, and provide the address. The letter must explain that such a request must be made within 10 working days of the hearing.

Review 2014

Critical Incidents Policy

The aim of this policy is to lessen the effect of a critical incident on the staff, children and parents at our school. It is anticipated that by adopting the procedures outlined in this policy we will provide a more secure environment for everyone associated with the school. In addition we hope to continue to maintain the strong working partnership linking home, school and the community.

What is a critical incident?

A critical incident is one which arises suddenly. Critical incidents may occur in school or out of school, but both types will have a major impact on staff and children.

Examples of in-school critical incidents

  • A serious accident to a child or adult

  • The death of a pupil or member of staff through natural causes, such as an illness

  • A traffic accident involving a pupil or staff member

  • Violence or assault within school

  • A school fire or explosion

  • Destruction of part of the school building

  • Abduction of a pupil

  • A pupil or pupils absconding

  • An illness such as meningitis within the school or the local community or a declared influenza pandemic.

Examples of out-of-school critical incidents

  • An accident to a pupil or staff while out of school on a visit or swimming etc.

  • Death or injuries on a school journey

  • Tragedies involving children from many schools eg the tragedy at Hillsborough Football Ground

  • Civil disturbances

  • Refugee children joining a school uprooted from their countries and perhaps shocked by wars or atrocities.

  • Natural disasters etc

 

Support Agencies and Personnel

A list of significant contacts and telephone numbers is held at school.

 

Practice within school.

The class teacher has an important role to play in managing critical incidents and will be the best person to deal with the pupils in her/his class. The main role of specialist agencies is one of support, empowerment and to support pupils who cannot be helped by the teachers within the school. In times of crisis teachers must react as they feel is appropriate and there can be no easy formula for dealing with critical incidents, but by ensuring good communication within school the crisis can be managed.

By outlining the appropriate actions to be taken in the event of a critical incident we aim to reduce the affect.

Practices include

  • Health & Safety issues

  • Evacuation of the school

  • Visits procedure

  • Use of contract coaches

  • Communication with the media

  • Infection control procedures

 

Issues during an incident

  1. The Head Teacher, Deputy or senior teacher must be informed of any critical incident as soon as possible.

  2. As soon as an incident is confirmed, the management team will meet to decide strategies.

  3. The rest of the staff will be informed as soon as possible, preferably at a specially convened staff meeting.

  4. All staff should share the same information.

  5. Pupils will be told information simply and sensitively, without fabrication, preferably in small group situations.

  6. The school will try, as far as possible, to keep to the normal routine.

  7. The school will ensure quick, clear communication with parents / carers.

  8. Further advice available from various agencies

 

ACTION PLAN

Differentiate between a major or minor incident.

Major incidents require the following procedures:-

  1. Set up a communication network.

  2. Inform immediately the Chair of Governors, Director of Children’s Services and any other appropriate Officers.

  3. Collect record and convey as much accurate information as possible.

  4. Identify two telephonists / telephones

  • School phone for incoming calls 01782 235676 or Headteacher's or Deputies Mobile
  • Staff mobiles from office contact list

  1. Reception area to be used for enquiries

  2. Use the up to date list of pupils' next of kin (record files) and contact parents of affected children

  3. Record all actions

  4. Headteacher / LA to act as 'press officer'

  5. Do not allow press/television on school premises

 

Action Plan Timing

Obtain factual information at the start

Who, when, where, what?

Extent of injuries, number and names

Location of injured, name + contact number for adult present

Hospital where injured are taken

Who has been informed

What has been said

Are staff / adults safe to drive – do they need collecting?

Immediately

RECORD ALL INFORMATION IN AN INCIDENT LOG

Times and details of actions

This is very important for subsequent investigations

CONTACT EMERGENCY SERVICES (if appropriate and it has not already been done)

Response needs to be appropriate to the incident

Senior staff meeting with support personnel

Staff released from other duties

ASAP

Establish CILT (critical incident leadership team)

Briefing to cover the incident

Actions to be taken immediately

Responsibilities of the team members

Establish independent phone line

Refer media to the press office

Buy time

No-one to talk to the press until details are clear, provide only facts

Immediately correct any incorrect or misleading information

Be sensitive about personal information

Do NOT apportion blame or liability

Praise and thank anyone or service that has helped

REMEMBER THERE ARE NO OFF THE RECORD CONVERSTAIONS WITH THE PRESS!

Advise Director of Children’s Services

ASAP

Contact families

Arrange for families children, adults and staff to be reunited.

ASAP

Misleading rumours should not be allowed to spread

Log calls

 

Have a factual script for the incident all parents told the same and then info about their child – injured / uninjured – hospital

Suggest they contact a relative or friend to be with them

If no information is available parents invited to gather together to wait in school

Contact counselors, Parish Priest

Record conversation

Contact the Priest in the case of serious accident

Father Laybourn

Call a staff meeting to give information

Same day if possible

Again factual

Reminders not to gossip or allow rumours to spread

Inform pupils in small groups

Same day if possible

Arrange a debriefing meeting for staff involved

Same day if possible

Arrange debriefing for pupils directly involved

Same day if possible

 

Prepare a letter for those parents not directly involved

Following day

Identify high risk pupils and staff

Following day

Promote discussion in classes

Following days and weeks

Identify the need for group or individual treatment

Over days and weeks

Facilitate support

Organise counselling

As required

Mark anniversary (discreetly)

Annually

 

The Director of Children’s Services will: -

  • Advise Public Relations Unit so that appropriate assistance is made to the school.

  • Ensure that the appropriate Officers, including Health & Safety, are advised of the crisis so that the best possible level of support can be made immediately available, as appropriate.

  • Ensure that those agencies or services that are skilled in offering counselling are alerted to the crisis so that support is available as soon as seen to be appropriate.

In determining the timing of the above response by the Local Authority, the Director of Children’s Services will be guided by the Headteacher, making certain that the support offered is timed to acknowledge the school's own response to the tragedy / critical incident.

 

SERIOUS ILLNESS / INFLUENZA PANDEMIC

In the event of a serious communicable illness, for example in the event of an influenza pandemic, the school will:

  • where possible, continue to operate normally whilst remaining alert to any adult / child exhibiting symptoms.

  • Ensure parents’ and carers’ contact details, including mobile phone numbers, are kept up to date

  • Ensure key staff know how to operate computerised texting service to ensure effective communication with parents and carers.

  • Ensure that any child / adult who is exhibiting symptoms stays at home and seeks medical advice

  • Contact Public Health Advisers for advice if a child or adult is confirmed as having the virus.

  • Delegate responsibility to the Head Teacher, in liaison with the Chair of Governors, to make the decision to close the school in the event of staffing falling below an acceptable level to ensure adequate Health and Safety.

  • The Local Authority, Public Heath Advisers, Police or Government may advise the school to close temporarily in order to contain the spread of infection or because there are high numbers of cases amongst pupils and / or staff.

  • The school would close at the end of that school day. Parents / Carers would not be expected to collect their children early.

  • Communicate clearly and effectively with parents / carers with regard to the illness and give appropriate advice and signpost to the appropriate agencies.

  • Regularly review infection control procedures including ensuring staff and pupils are advised about effective hand washing, use and disposal of tissues etc.

  • Regularly review stocks of anti-viral hand gel, soaps, yellow disposal bags, medical gloves and aprons etc.

  • Prepare plans for keeping children’s learning going if the school has to be closed for a period of time. If the school is closed for up to 3 days arrange for staff to send appropriate work home with children on the day of closure (e.g. extra reading books, story writing frames / activities, maths worksheets, research questions related to topics etc). Arrange for this to be posted to absent children. If the school is closed for a longer period arrange for work to be posted on the website. Text message parents to let them know. Post out to any who request if possible.

  • During periods of closure staff will be expected to work at home and to keep a log of work undertaken. Staff will be expected to take home enough work for the expected period of closure. (including support staff e.g. display, making resources etc). For extended periods of closure additional tasks will be sent by e-mail.

 

INTRUDER ALERT

1. The risk of an intruder entering the premises has been minimised by the risk assessment on site security.

2. All visitors access the building by the office entrance. Visitors

must sign the visitors’ book and will be issued with a badge.

3. Staff are trained to approach strangers in a on-confrontational way. They must use their professional judgement to take the stranger to the nearest exit, the office entrance or to raise the alarm by pressing the fire alarm.

 

BOMB ALERT

  1. In the event of an emergency, our first priority will be to get everyone away from the building as quickly and safely as possible.
  2. Staff to check their own exit door(s) to enable them to leave the classroom safely. We will initially assemble at the far end of the football field.
  3. St Wilfrid’s has a reciprocal evacuation arrangement with nearby Tunstall Methodist Church. We will walk to the church in the event of an emergency.
  4. Parents would be given text messages to collect children from Tunstall Methodist Church.

 

VISITS

  1. A visits file will be kept for records of all visits this information will also be uploaded onto Stoke’s EVOLVE web based system. Form to be completed by the organising teacher. Education Visits Co-ordinator to ensure all visits are authorised and all details are entered onto EVOLVE.

  2. Parents will be informed of the Insurance Cover for Visits via the School Prospectus.

  3. A mobile phone must be taken on all visits and kept switched on at all times. The number of the mobile phone must be recorded on the visits form.

  4. There must be designated contact person based at the school for the duration of the visit.

  5. The following items should be taken on visits:-

  • First Aid Equipment
  • Camera
  • Asthma Inhalers
  • Spare Clothes
  1. Additional information relating to pupils with special needs eg relating to medical treatment in case of an emergency.

  2. A signed agreement from parents for all visits involving transport must have been received (The parent who signs MUST have parental responsibility for the child).

  3. Signed agreement for local walks must be obtained from parents on entry of the pupil into school.

  4. Local coach companies are used to transport pupils and the best tender accepted. All pupils and staff must have a seat with a seat belt. On occasions when the school hires a minibus to transport pupils booster seats are available for those pupils under the required height for an adult seat. Pupils and staff must use the seat belts provided.

  5. The ratio between adults and children must be at least 1:10 from Y4-Y6, 1:6 from Y3YR and 1:4 for Nursery.

  6. The minibus will only be driven by a member of staff who has had an up to date minibus driving assessment. There must also be an adult on the minibus, in addition to the driver, to supervise the pupils.

  7. A copy of the Critical Incidents Policy must be taken on each visit together with a list of children attending.

 

ACCIDENTS/BREAKDOWNS

  1. Attempt to park in a safe place.

  2. Keep the passengers in the vehicle with seat belts fastened unless there is a danger of fire.

  3. Note your precise location.

  4. Assess the situation and report the details to school as soon as possible.

  5. If on the motorway park on the hard shoulder and contact the police immediately.

  6. An adult must remain with the children at all times.

 

INJURIES

  1. Assess the injured without injury to you, keep them warm until help arrives.

  2. Give First Aid assistance if appropriate and safe to do so.

  3. Reassure and protect the injured from further danger.

  4. Send for help - Dial 999 you will need to know:-

  • Your telephone number
  • Your location
  • The incident conditions
  • How many involved
  • How serious the situation

 

DELAYS

If delayed contact the school at the earliest possible opportunity and proceed at a safe speed.

School Number 01782 235676 or Headteacher's Mobile

Next Review Spring 2014

E-Safety

E-Safety Policy

E-Safety encompasses Internet technologies and electronic communications such as mobile phones as well as collaboration tools and personal publishing. It highlights the need to educate pupils about the benefits and risks of using technology and provides safeguards and awareness for users to enable them to control their online experience.

Any previous Internet policy should be revised and renamed as the school’s e Safety Policy to reflect the need to raise awareness of the safety issues associated with electronic communications as a whole.

The school’s e-safety policy will operate in conjunction with other policies including those for Student Behaviour, Bullying, Curriculum, Data Protection and Security.

The C&YP Core e-Safety Policy

This core e-safety policy provides the essential minimal school e-safety policy and has been approved by the Children and Young People’s Services. C&YP considers that all the elements with a  bullet are mandatory in order to protect users, the school and Stoke-on-Trent City Council.

Optional elements, marked with a round bullet, may be added if appropriate.

The schools’ e-Safety Policy Guidance and Template  provides a full discussion of e-safety issues and links to further information.

End to End e-Safety

E-Safety depends on effective practice at a number of levels:

  • Responsible ICT use by all staff and students, encouraged by education and made explicit through published policies.

  • Sound implementation of e-safety policy in both administration and curriculum, including secure school network design and use.

  • Safe and secure broadband from the Stoke-on-Trent Education WAN including the effective management of Websense filtering.

  • National Education Network standards and specifications.

School e-safety policy

The  bullets below are the essential minimum points for a school e Safety Policy.  Some optional points have been retained, but schools should refer to the Schools e-Safety Policy Guidance, to facilitate a full discussion.

The  elements enable a school to demonstrate that its e-Safety Policy is compliant with the C&YP approved policy.  Naturally, policy must be translated into practice in order to protect pupils and educate them in responsible ICT use.

2.1           Writing and reviewing the e-safety policy

The e-Safety Policy is part of the School Development Plan and relates to other policies including those for ICT, Bullying and for Child Protection.

The school will appoint an e-Safety Coordinator.  This may be the Designated Child Protection Coordinator as the roles overlap.

  • Our e-Safety Policy has been written by the school, building on the Stoke-on-Trent e Safety Policy and government guidance.  It has been agreed by senior management and approved by governors and the PTA.

  • The e-Safety Policy and its implementation will be reviewed annually.

2.2  Teaching and learning

2.2.1  Why are new technologies and Internet use important

  • The Internet is an essential element in 21st century life for education, business and social interaction. The school has a duty to provide students with quality Internet access as part of their learning experience.

  • Internet use is a part of the statutory curriculum and a necessary tool for staff and pupils.

2.2.2  Internet use will enhance learning

The school Internet access will be designed expressly for pupil use and will include filtering appropriate to the age of pupils.

Pupils will be taught what Internet use is acceptable and what is not and will be given clear objectives for Internet use.

  • Pupils will be educated in the effective use of the Internet in research, including the skills of effective knowledge location, retrieval and evaluation.

2.2.3  Pupils will be taught how to evaluate Internet content

The school will ensure that the copying and subsequent use of Internet derived materials by staff and pupils complies with copyright law.

  • Pupils should be taught to be critically aware of the materials they read and shown how to validate information before accepting its accuracy.

2.2.4  Pupils will be taught how to stay e-safe

Curriculum planning will include age appropriate opportunities to discuss, role play and learn about the benefits and risks offered by new technologies, such as e-mail, mobile phones and social networking sites.

  • E-safety delivery will be mapped across the curriculum to ensure full coverage.

  • E-safety delivery will include the safe use of mobile phones.

2.3  Managing Internet Access

2.3.1  Information system security

Virus protection will be updated regularly on all networked computers.

School ICT systems capacity and security will be reviewed regularly.

2.3.2  E-mail

Pupils may only use approved e-mail accounts on the school system.

Pupils must immediately tell a teacher if they receive offensive e-mail.

Pupils must not reveal personal details of themselves or others in e-mail communication, or arrange to meet anyone without specific permission.

2.3.3  Public Web published content and the school web site

The contact details on the website should be the school address, e-mail and telephone number. Staff or pupils’ personal information will not be published.

  • E-mail addresses will be published carefully, to avoid spam harvesting.

  • The Headteacher or nominee will take overall editorial responsibility and ensure that content is accurate and appropriate.

  • The website should comply with the school’s guidelines for publications, including respect for intellectual property rights and copyright.

2.3.4  Web Publishing pupils’ images and work

Images, published to the web, that include pupils will be selected carefully and will not enable individual pupils to be clearly identified.

Pupils’ full names will not be used anywhere on the website, particularly in association with photographs.

Written permission from parents/carers will be obtained before images of pupils are electronically published to the web.

  • Pupil’s work can only be published to the website with the permission of the pupil and parents/carers.

2.3.5  Social networking and personal publishing

The City Council/school will block/filter access to social networking sites, except those specifically purposed to support educationally approved practice.

Newsgroups will be blocked unless a specific use is approved.

Staff and pupils will be advised never to give out personal details of any kind which may identify them or their location.

  • Pupils and parents/carers will be advised that the use of social network spaces, outside school based controlled systems (i.e. SCORE/ Learning Platform), is inappropriate for primary aged pupils, unless strictly supervised.

  • Staff and pupils should be advised not to publish specific and detailed private thoughts on social networking sites.

2.3.6  Managing filtering

The school will work with Stoke-on-Trent City Council, Becta and the WAN Managed Service Provider to ensure systems to protect pupils are reviewed and improved.

If staff or pupils discover an unsuitable site, the URL must be reported to the school filtering manager (nominated contact), the e Safety Coordinator or the WAN Managed Service Provider helpdesk.

2.3.7  Managing remote teaching/video-conferencing

The equipment and network

Full IP videoconferencing will use the national educational or the schools’ broadband network to ensure quality of service and security.

  • All videoconferencing equipment in the classroom must be switched off when not in use and not set to auto answer.

  • Equipment connected to the educational broadband network will use the national E.164 numbering system and display their H.323 ID name.

  • External IP addresses will not be made available to other sites.

  • Videoconferencing contact information will not be put on the school Website.

  • School videoconferencing equipment will not be taken off school premises without permission, since use over a non-educational network (e.g. the internet) cannot be monitored or controlled.

Users

Pupils will ask permission from the supervising teacher before making or answering a videoconference call.

Videoconferencing will be supervised appropriately for the pupils’ age.

  • Parents/Carers will agree for their children to take part in videoconferences, probably in the annual return.

  • Responsibility for the use of the videoconferencing equipment outside school time will be established with care.

  • Only key administrators will be given access to the videoconferencing system, web or other remote control page available on larger systems.

  • Unique log on and password details for the educational videoconferencing services will only be issued to members of staff and kept secure.

Content

  • When recording a videoconference lesson, written permission will be sought by all sites and participants. The reason for the recording is given and the recording of videoconference is clear to all parties at the start of the conference.

  • Recorded material will be stored securely.

  • If third-party materials are to be included, recordings will be checked that they are acceptable to avoid infringing the third party intellectual property rights.

  • Dialogue will be established with other conference participants before taking part in a videoconference. If it is a non school site it is checked that they are delivering material that is appropriate for the class.

2.3.8  Managing emerging technologies

Emerging technologies will be examined for educational benefit and a risk assessment will be carried out and protocols established before use in school is allowed.

  • Mobile phones will not be used during lessons or formal school time, unless specifically allowed to support learning as identified by the teacher. The sending of abusive or inappropriate text messages is forbidden.

  • Staff will be issued with a school phone where text or mobile contact with pupils is required.

2.3.9  Protecting personal data

Personal data will be recorded, processed, transferred and made available according to the Data Protection Act 1998.

2.4  Policy Decisions

2.4.1  Authorising Internet access

The school will maintain a current record of all staff and pupils who are granted access to the school’s electronic communications, which includes internet access. The record will be kept up-to-date, for instance a member of staff may leave or a pupil’s access be withdrawn.

All staff must read and sign the ‘Staff Information Systems Code of Conduct’ before using any school ICT resource.

At Key Stage 1 access to the Internet will be by adult demonstration or by directly supervised access to specific, approved on-line materials.

Parents/Carers will be asked to sign and return a consent form.

Sanctions for inappropriate use will be drawn up and shared with staff and pupils.

2.4.2  Assessing risks

The school will take all reasonable precautions to ensure that users access only appropriate material. However, due to the international scale and linked nature of Internet content, it is not possible to guarantee that unsuitable material will never appear on a school computer. Neither the school nor Stoke-on-Trent City Council can accept liability for the material accessed, or any consequences of Internet access.

The school will audit ICT provision to establish if the e-safety policy is adequate and that the implementation of the e-safety policy is appropriate.

  • The use of computer systems without permission or for inappropriate purposes could constitute a criminal offence under the Computer Misuse Act 1990.

  • Methods to identify, assess and minimise risks will be reviewed regularly.

2.4.3  Handling e-safety complaints

Complaints of Internet misuse will be dealt with by a senior member of staff.

Any complaint about staff misuse must be referred to the Headteacher.

  • Complaints of a child protection nature must be dealt with in accordance with school child protection procedures.

  • Pupils and parents/carers will be informed of the complaints procedure.

  • Parents/Carers and pupils will need to work in partnership with staff to resolve issues.

  • Sanctions within the school discipline policy will include:

    • interview/counselling by the head of key stage;

    • informing parents/carers or carers;

    • removal or restriction of Internet or computer access for a period.

2.4.4  Community use of the Internet

  • The school will liaise with local organisations to establish a common approach to e-safety.

2.4.5 Cyberbullying – Understanding and addressing the issues

While cyberbullying is likely to be low level in primary schools the age of pupils making proficient use of technology is ever decreasing.  Therefore, the opportunities for pupils to bully or be bullied via technology, such as e-mail, texts or MSN, are becoming more frequent.

As such, teaching pupils about appropriate behaviours when using technology provides a vital grounding for future use.  Whilst not wanting to provoke unrecognised opportunities in pupils, consideration must be given to suitable teaching and procedures to address any issues of cyberbullying.

As felt appropriate for the age and use of technology by the pupils:

  • The school’s anti-bullying policy and/or school behaviour policy will address cyberbullying. Cyberbullying will also be addressed in ICT, PHSE and other relevant lessons and is brought to life through activities.  As with other whole-school policies, all staff and young people will be included and empowered to take part in the process.

  • Pupils, parents/carers, staff and governors will all be made aware of the consequences of cyberbullying.  Young people and their parents/carers will be made aware of pupils’ rights and responsibilities in their use of new technologies, and what the sanctions are for misuse.

  • Parents/Carers will be provided with an opportunity to find out more about cyberbullying through: session for parents/carers, guidance, websites published in newsletter.

2.4.6   Cyberbullying – How will risks be assessed?

The school will take all reasonable precautions to ensure against cyberbullying whilst pupils are in its care. However, due to the global and connected nature of new technologies, it is not possible to guarantee that inappropriate use via a school computer will not occur.  Neither the school, nor Stoke-on-Trent City Council, can accept liability for inappropriate use, or any consequences resulting outside of school.

The school will proactively engage with KS2 pupils in preventing cyberbullying by:

  • understanding and talking about cyberbullying, e.g. inappropriate use of e-mail, text messages;

  • keeping existing policies and practices up-to-date with new technologies;

  • ensuring easy and comfortable procedures for reporting;

  • promoting the positive use of technology;

  • evaluating the impact of prevention activities.

Records of any incidents of cyberbullying will be kept and will be used to help to monitor the effectiveness of the school’s prevention activities.

2.4.7       How will cyberbullying reports/issues be handled?

Complaints of cyberbullying will be dealt with by a senior member of staff.

Any complaint about staff misuse must be referred to the Headteacher.

Evidence of offending messages, pictures or online conversations will be kept, in order to demonstrate to others what is happening.  It can be used by the school, internet service provider, mobile phone company, or the police, to investigate the cyberbullying.

  • Pupils and parents/carers will be informed of the complaints procedure.

  • Parents/Carers and pupils will need to work in partnership with staff to resolve issues.

2.5  Communications Policy

2.5.1  Introducing the e-safety policy to pupils

E-safety rules will be posted in all networked rooms and discussed with pupils at the start of each year and as the need arises.

Pupils will be informed that network and Internet use will be monitored.

  • An e-Safety training programme will be introduced to raise the awareness and importance of safe and responsible internet use/use of mobile phones.

  • Instruction in responsible and safe use should precede Internet access.

  • An e-Safety module will be included in the PSHE, Citizenship or ICT programmes covering both school and home use.

2.5.2  Staff and the E-Safety policy

All staff will be given the School E-Safety Policy and its application and importance explained.

All staff will be informed that all computer and Internet use will be monitored. Discretion and professional conduct is essential.

Staff training in safe and responsible Internet use and on the school e Safety Policy will be provided as required.

  • Staff that manage filtering systems or monitor ICT use will be supervised by senior management and have clear procedures for reporting issues.

2.5.3  Enlisting parents/carers support

Parents/Carers’ attention will be drawn to the School e-Safety Policy in newsletters, the school brochure, on the school website and through parents/carers awareness sessions held regularly.

  • Parents/Carers views and ideas will be canvassed by questionnaires.

  • Parents/Carers are welcome to bring any issues to staff to deal with.

  • Parents/Carers will be kept informed about e-safety teaching as is takes place each term.

  • Review 2014

Educational Vists Policy

Overview

The school acknowledges the great value of Educational Visits in broadening and enhancing both the learning and social experience of pupils.

Under statutory guidance which came into effect on 1st March 2004, all schools are required to have a named Educational Visits Co-ordinator (EVC), who will ensure that the planning and supervision of all visits and adventurous activities meet the DfES Requirements and LA guidelines.

The School’s Headteacher is Dianne Mason

The School’s EVC is Chris Manifold

Planning A Visit

It is essential that all visits have sound and clearly stated educational aims. It is important that the trip is planned so that it can be administered on EVOLVE at least two weeks before the trip date. If the cost of trip exceeds £5 the parents must be given at least 4 week’s notice and given the opportunity to pay in instalments.

Before the visit;

  • Ensure that the correct adult /staff ratios can be arranged for the visit

  • Book visit

  • Book transport

  • Send letter home to parents

  • Complete a risk assessment

  • Log on to EVOLVE

  • Inform school cook of date and if a packed lunches are required

Approval for Visits

All visits will require the authorisation of both the Headteacher and EVC.

All visits must be processed on EVOLVE at least 2 weeks before the visit takes place. Residential visits must be processed on EVOLVE at least 6 weeks before the visit.

EVOLVE can be accessed by visiting www.schoolvisits.org.uk. All teaching staff are issued with their own username and password. User names and passwords are issued by the EVC.

Approval of ‘normal’ day visits is at the discretion of the EVC and Headteacher. However; visits that are either:

  • overseas

  • residential or

  • involving an adventurous activity

will require the additional approval of the LA. The governing body will also need to be informed about these visits prior to a commitment being made.

Competence to Lead

Any member of staff leading a visit will need to have their ‘competence to lead’ assessed before approval for the visit is given. For the majority of visits this will be assessed by the EVC.

Assessment of Risk

Risk Assessment’ is a careful examination of what could cause harm to pupils, staff or others, together with an identification of the control measures necessary in order to reduce risks to a level which, in the professional judgement of the assessor, is deemed to be acceptable (ie. low).

In considering risk, there are 3 levels of which visit leaders should be mindful:

  • Generic Risks – normal risks attached to any activity out of school. These will be covered by careful completion of the ‘Educational Visits Checklist’.

  • Event Specific Risk – any significant hazard or risk relating to the specific activity and outside the scope of item 1 above. These should be recorded on Form EV5 (available in EVOLVE under Forms)

  • Ongoing Risk – the monitoring of risks throughout the actual visit as circumstances change.

A risk assessment must be completed for every visit that takes place and is part of the process of recording the visit on EVOLVE.

THE HEADTEACHER WILL CANCEL ANY TRIP THAT

HAS NOT BEEN AUTHORISED VIA EVOLVE

Risk assessments must include arrangements for;

  • children with behaviour problems

  • children with mobility difficulties

  • asthmatic children

  • children with allergies

  • weather conditions, administering sun cream

  • staff/pupil ratios

  • abduction

  • traffic accident

A copy of the risk assessment form is available in EVOLVE.

Adult/Pupil Ratio

A professional judgement must be made by the Visit Leader, Headteacher and Deputy as to the appropriate ratio for each visit.

This will be determined by:

  • type, duration and level of activity

  • needs of individuals within the group (SEN)

  • experience and competence of staff and accompanying adults

  • nature of the venue

  • weather conditions at the time of year

  • nature of transport involved

Prior to a visit being planned staff must ensure that the correct adult/pupil ratio can be arranged. An assessment of risk may indicate a need for a higher ratio, eg special needs children, problematic behaviour etc.

The DFES ‘Health & Safety of Pupils on Educational Visits’ good practice guide recommends the following ratios be used as guidance when assessing supervision;

  • Foundation Stage 1:3 (Nursery & Reception)

  • KS1 1:6 (Y1 to Y3)

  • KS2 1:10 (Y4 to Y6)

Plan B

Despite the most detailed and sedulous pre-visit planning, things can go wrong on the day, e.g. parent helper is unavailable, member of staff is ill, transport fails to arrive, museum have lost booking, etc. To avoid having to make important decisions under pressure, it is important that some advanced thinking is done to cater for any foreseeable eventuality. This takes the form of Plan B.

Supervision

Pupils must be supervised throughout all visits. However, there are circumstances when they might be unaccompanied by an adult (remote supervision). The decision to allow remote supervision should be based on risk assessment and must take into account factors such as:

  • prior experience of pupils

  • age of pupils

  • responsibility of pupils

  • competence/experience of staff

  • environment/venue

Role of Supervising Parents/Volunteers

Supervising parents must be fully briefed on the programme, venue, activities, supervision arrangements and their responsibilities. They must also be given a written list of the pupils in their immediate care, and be shown the completed risk assessment.

Any parent / volunteer must have a clear in date Enhanced CRB or have a List 99 check prior to the visit. List 99 checks can be made via the Local Authority HR dept (tel no 8234) who will require the full name and date of birth of the parent/volunteer.

First Aid

The level of first aid provision should be based on risk assessment. On all visits there should be a member of staff who has a good working knowledge of first aid. The Appointed Person First Aid Certificate is the minimum requirement for residential visits.

First aid kits are available from the school office and if the visit involves the party splitting up by any distance, a kit should be taken for each group.

Administering Medicine / Inhalers on a School Trip

  • Administering Medicine

Essential medicine can be administered on a school trip but the parent must sign and complete a consent slip prior to the visit. A member of staff must be designated to take care of the medicine and to administer it at the time/times stated by the parent, this must be witnessed by another member of staff. The consent form requires a signature from both of these staff members.

  • Asthmatic Pupils

Asthmatic children are registered by the parents and they are required to ensure that an in date inhaler is in school at all times. A list of asthmatic pupils is listed at the front of each class attendance register. It is the responsibility of the class teacher to ensure that the inhalers are taken onto every trip.

Transport

Travel arrangements should be included in the risk assessment. If public transport is to be used, all pupils and supervisors must be fully briefed as to procedures on platforms, at bus stops, on busy streets etc.

If travel is by coach or minibus, all pupils must wear a seat belt. Staff must ensure that pupils comply with this rule; pupils may also be asked to check the seat belt of their neighbour. If a minibus is being borrowed or hired, the driver must have passed the LBWF test for the driving of council vehicles or the equivalent Community Transport test.

If any pupils are to travel by car, the driver must complete Form EV6 (available on EVOLVE under forms). This is also relevant to sports fixtures, and applies to both staff and parents’ cars. A new form must be completed every academic year.

Water ‘Margin’ Activities

Where pupils might participate in learning activities near or in water, such as a walk along a riverbank or seashore, collecting samples in ponds or streams, or paddling or walking in gentle, shallow water, then the guidance contained in DfES ‘Group Safety at Water Margins’ is relevant. All staff, including parents, should be provided with a copy of this guidance prior to the visit. A copy of this is available on EVOLVE.

Insurance

The school subscribes to a ‘School Journey/Personal Accident’ insurance policy via the Local Authority. The policy states that the use of EVOLVE is compulsory for all off-site trips.

Communication in the Event of an Emergency

The breakfast club mobile phone must be taken out on every trip by the trip leader (this is available from the school office). Any member of staff accompanying the trip must also leave their mobile number at the school office.

In the event of the need to contact the school a list of emergency telephone numbers is available in the First Aid kit.

Seeking Parental Consent

Parents should be made fully aware of any likely risks of the visit and their management, so they may consent or refuse on a fully informed basis (known as ‘Acknowledgement of Risk’).

The letter to parents should therefore give full detail of the visit, the reason for the visit (educational aims), supervision arrangements and the transport arrangements. Ensure that detail of other incidental activities is included, together with Plan B if appropriate. The letter should also state the cost of the visit per child.

The reply slip should read:-

I give permission for my child _______ to take part in ….. I have read and understand the information about the visit. I enclose my voluntary contribution.”

In the case of sports fixtures, the reply slip should read:-

My child ______________ is able to play in the ……. match (at ……..) on ………..

I have read and understand the information in the letter, and give permission for my child to take part.”

On the Day of the Visit

Be sure to:-

  • Collect first aid kit(s) / inhalers

  • Collect bags for travel sickness

  • Collect pupils asthma inhalers

  • Collect packed lunches from cook

  • Collect breakfast club mobile phone and ensure it is working and charged

  • Give office staff the mobile numbers of any staff/parents/volunteers accompanying the trip and take mobile number of EVC to use should school main number be engaged.

  • Brief supervising parents/volunteers on the risk assessment

  • Give supervising parents their lists of pupils

  • Count pupils

During the course of the visit, pupils should be counted regularly as appropriate, and always when changing locations. Always ‘double-count’.

The mobile phone(s) should be switched on throughout the day.

After the Visit

It is important that after each visit a proper debrief takes place. This should take place within a week of the visit date, and should involve the Visit Leader, accompanying staff and, if appropriate, the supervising parents. The purpose of this is to identify what went well and what could have been done better, in order to inform future planning.

Policy Adopted 17 May 2010 – Governors Staffing, Curriculum & Ethos Sub Committee Meeting

Review alongside Health and safety

Equality

Equal Opportunities

The school will ensure that it:

  • Promotes equalising opportunities ensuring that all children and staff can achieve and that these achievements are valued.

  • Promotes equality of opportunity for disabled people: pupils, staff, parents, carers and other people who use the school or may wish to;

and at St. Wilfrid’s we aim to build on the distinctive Catholic ethos and success of our school, through our commitment to the Every Child Matters’ framework.

Every pupil with additional needs in this inclusive school has an entitlement to fulfil his/ her optimum potential.

This is achieved by ensuring the well being of all pupils in relation to; being healthy, staying safe, enjoying and achieving, making a positive contribution, and achieving social and economic well-being”

At St. Wilfrid’s, we are committed to ensuring equality of opportunity for:

  • Pupils with disabilities in relation to education and associated services

  • Staff with disabilities in relation to employment rights, conditions and opportunities

  • All parents and members of the local community with disabilities in relation to additional services offered by, or at our school.

We aim to enable all pupils including those with Additional Educational Needs, Special Educational Needs and/ or disabilities, ethnic minorities to have access to a broad and balanced curriculum by making reasonable adjustments to ensure that no pupil is placed at a substantial disadvantage. The school is committed to promoting equal opportunities for all pupils by making reasonable adjustments and removing barriers in all areas of school life.

Gender

Care will be taken, wherever possible, not to exclude students or staff from activities because of their gender.

The school’s gender policy will be made explicit to new members of the school and to parents of all students at the school.

Racial Equality

Racist remarks and behaviour will be challenged immediately, firmly and consistently.

All racist incidents will be dealt with immediately. All staff - including dinnertime supervisors - are aware of “Racist Incident” forms. We will endeavour to ensure that all children are aware of the forms, and how to access them.

 

 

Equal Opportunites Policy

ST WILFRID’S CATHOLIC

PRIMARY SCHOOL

Promoting

Equal Opportunities

Policy

'An entitlement to learning must be an entitlement for all pupils'.

Contents

  1. School’s Vision and Values 
  2. Introduction 
  3. Roles and Responsibilities  
  4. Specific Aims                                                                                                 
  5. School Strategies
  6. Racial Equality 
  7. Gender Equality
  8. Disability Equality 

Also refer to;

  • Racial Equality Policy
  • School’s Learning and Teaching Policy
  • Positive Behaviour Policy
  • Anti Bullying Policy
  • Collective Worship Policy
  • Community Cohesion Policy
  • Safeguarding Policy
  • Disabilty Equality Scheme
  • Special And Educational Needs Policy
  • Foundation Stage Learning Policies
  • Curriculum Policies


 

  1. School’s Vision and Values

Our Vision

At St Wilfrid’s Catholic School, we are very clear and specific about our vision for learning.  Our school development plan outlines our current priorities for achieving this.  We believe that our children;

  • Should receive an education that develops a positive attitude for learning.  We want our children to see themselves as the ‘learners of the future’ and understand that they have choices about their future.  At St Wilfrid’s Catholic School, we want ‘smart’ learners who understand that hard work, progress and resilience are the essential ingredients for a successful future.
  • Should all have the necessary basic skills to be ‘learners for the future’.
  • Should grow in an educational environment that nurtures their personal development.
  • Should access a curriculum that inspires and motivates them.  Learning should be a process of exploration and wonder.
  • Should view themselves as part of a community.  We should help them to find their voice and help them to understand how to contribute in a positive way.

It is only on this basis that the school can evaluate if it has been successful.

Our Values

St Wilfrid’s Catholic School is a ‘learning community’.  How we work and grow together is even more important that what we do.  We believe that it is the ‘how’ we do things that characterises the most successful schools.  This is what we aspire to be.

At St Wilfrid’s Catholic School we believe that:

  1. Everybody is entitled to high quality provision, all of the time.
    • As a professional community, we have an obligation to ensure that our work is as good as it can be, every day.  We do not accept underperformance from our colleagues and aim to support each other as we develop.
    • As a learning community, all our children have an obligation to follow our school’s mission statement.  Our school should be a safe, happy and respectful place that allows everybody to learn.  This has to be respected by staff, pupils and parents.
  2. Children should learn with support when it is needed and without discrimination at all times.
    • As a professional community we are determined to meet the needs of all our children as well as we can.  We will ensure that we do not allow any child to be discriminated against or experience discrimination without a direct intervention.
    • As a learning community all our children have the right to learn without discrimination.  This has to be respected by staff, pupils and parents.
  3. Our school is committed to continually improving as a learning organisation.
    • As a professional community, all members have an obligation to develop.  This is evident in how we engage as professional learners and our commitment to support improvements in school policy.  At St Wilfrid’s Catholic School we do not accept ‘second best’.
    • As a learning community we have an obligation to involve pupils, parents and other members of our school community if we are to make significant improvement.  We have to recognise that it is the partnership that makes the significant difference.

These values should be at the heart of our planning process and will guide our school as we seek to improve.

2.  INTRODUCTION

All pupils at St Wilfrid’s Catholic School have an equal right to develop and achieve their potential. Equality of opportunity underpins all our work, the development of the school curriculum and the work of the school. Children at St Wilfrid’s are valued as individuals with their own abilities, difficulties, attitudes, backgrounds and experiences. We recognize that addressing inequalities and promoting equality is a matter of improving outcomes for all children.

The Children’s Act 2004 and the subsequent focus on eliminating inequalities through the Children’s Plan has clearly charged school’s with a responsibility to address inequalities in outcomes. 

At St Wilfrid’s we aim for an atmosphere of trust and respect among children as well as between staff and children. Our work on citizenship, PSHE and our ‘Change School’ education programme is directly concerned with how we treat each other and, more importantly, how we learn to respect one another and ourselves as citizens of the world. It also fosters an understanding of the diversity of cultures and needs that exist in school and in the wider community.

3.  ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

3.1     PARENTS and CARERS:
We will introduce and communicate the equal opportunities policy to parents through the school prospectus, the school’s website, induction meetings with parents and on parents evenings.  It is absolutely essential that families recognise equality is at the heart of the ethos of our school.

Parents have a right to ensure that this policy is enforced.  In addition they also have a responsibility to accept the school’s aims and objectives.  It is also a key component of our home-school agreement.

3.2     CHILDREN:
It is the right of every child irrespective of race, culture, class, gender, special needs or ability to achieve their full potential.

Each child should have access to an education, which will enable him / her to utilise their talents to the full and achieve their potential. We must develop children to become sensitive to and aware of ways in which equality of opportunity is denied and how this might affect them in society. 

3.3     STAFF
It is the responsibility of all staff to foster and facilitate this ideal by creating a welcoming and nurturing environment for all children. Staff have a responsibility to establish an atmosphere within school that effectively reduces prejudice and raises self esteem, so that all children can develop independence, freedom of choice and a knowledge of their right to take on whatever roles they choose, no matter what their cultural background, gender or ability.

As a staff we have to remember that we are role models. We must challenge the concept of discrimination based upon differences of race, beliefs, gender and special needs or disabilities.  We have to ensure that we are aware of how discrimination can implicitly take place and be aware of the importance of equality at all time.

As a staff team we must monitor the progress of groups of pupils and ensure that we take action to address underachievement in specific groups.

Currently we have the following systems in place;

  • Effective data monitoring systems are used to review the progress of pupils.
  • Termly face to face pupil progress meetings are held in schools.
  • Effective safeguarding process are in place to identify, support and improve outcomes for children.
  • Effective partnerships are used through Change School funding, Extended Schools Subsidy Funding and other budget lines to target provision for groups of children.  This has included self esteem programmes, attendance at extended school clubs, focused tuition etc.
  • Provision mapping is used to target the school’s resources and improve outcomes for particular groups.
  • We have effective systems for monitoring and responding to issues of bullying, racism and other prejudices if they occur.

 

3.4     Governing Body

The governing body has set out its commitment to equal opportunities in this policy statement, and it will continue to do all it can to ensure that all members of the school community are treated fairly and with equality

The primary responsibility of the governing body is to promote the aims of this policy and ensure that they are aware of their role in ensuring that St Wilfrid’s school effectively combats discrimination in all of our work.

The Governing Body has a role to evaluate and monitor the implementation of this policy.  They should work with the head teacher to ensure that the school fulfills our vision and values as well as our statutory responsibilities.

Governors have a responsibility and a role to monitor any complaints regarding equal opportunities.

This work may be evident in the work of the full governing body or through the focused work of committees.  Currently the governing body has systems and processes in place to;

  • Review accessibility and health and safety provision through the Health and Safety, Buildings and Grounds committee.
  • Review how the curriculum and the school’s extended provision promote equality through the work of the Every Child Matters Committee.
  • Monitor school outcomes to ensure that no specific groups are being discriminated against according to outcomes.
  • Ensure that resources are effectively used to ensure equality of opportunity as part of the remit of the finance committee.
  • Evaluate how the school monitors issues or incidents of inequality or prejudice.
  • Ensure that all employment processes are undertaken equitably and without prejudice to any applicant.

3.5     Head Teacher

As the leader of the school and undertaking the ex-offico role with governors is the head teacher’s responsibility to ensure that this policy is effectively implemented and openly monitored.

  • It is the headteacher’s role to implement the school’s equal opportunities and anti-racist policy and s/he is supported by the governing body in so doing.
  • It is the headteacher’s role to ensure that all staff are aware of the school policy on equal opportunities, and that teachers apply these guidelines fairly in all situations.
  • The headteacher ensures that all appointments panels give due regard to this policy, so that no-one is discriminated against when it comes to employment or training opportunities.
  • The headteacher promotes the principle of equal opportunity when developing the curriculum, and promotes respect for other people in all aspects of school life, for example, in the assembly, where respect for other people is a regular theme, and in displays shown around the school.
  • The headteacher treats all incidents of unfair treatment and any racist incidents with due seriousness.
  • The headteacher will review pupil progress in basic skills on a termly basis.

4. SPECIFIC AIMS:

Our Policy on Equal opportunities is to ensure that:

  • We do not discriminate against anyone, be they staff, pupil, parent or visitor.  We are aware that there are statutory guidelines that should be fulfilled  on the grounds of sex, race, colour, religion, nationality, ethnic or national origins. This is in line with the 1976 Race Relations Act and covers both direct and indirect discrimination.
  • We promote the principles of fairness and justice for all through the education that we provide in our school.
  • We ensure that all pupils are fully supported to achieve academic outcomes and the five areas outlined under the Every Child Matter’s legislation.  They are;
  • Be Healthy
  • Be Safe
  • Enjoy and Achieve
  • Make a Positive Contribution
  • Achieve Economic Well Being

 

  • We constantly strive to remove any forms of indirect discrimination that may form barriers to learning.
  • We ensure that all recruitment, employment, promotion and training systems are fair to all, and provide opportunities for everyone to achieve.
  • We challenge stereotyping and prejudice whenever it occurs.
  • We celebrate the cultural diversity of our local, national and global community.
  • We are aware that prejudice and stereotyping is caused by low self-image and ignorance. Through positive educational experiences and support for each individual’s point of view, we aim to promote positive social attitudes and respect for all.
  • To promote the development of basic skills in ICT, Literacy and Numeracy for under performing pupils
  • There is a commitment to minimising all school exclusions by implementing agreed strategies and procedures ensuring that each child is given the opportunity to achieve and succeed
  • Absences, racist incidents and bullying incidents are recorded, monitored and acted upon.

5. SCHOOL STRATEGIES

THE CURRICULUM

At St Wilfrid’s Catholic Primary we have redesigned our curriculum to ensure that it strives to promote equal opportunities for all children in our school.  It is a curriculum that reflects the interests of all groups and addresses stereo-types associated with topics such as migration. 

All children should have equal access to the curriculum and learning opportunities at St Wilfrid’s.  No child should ever be discriminated in their access to the curriculum.  We will need to monitor our practices to achieve this.  Children should be given the opportunity:

  • To make choices without prejudice about extended provision, responsibility posts etc.
  • To gain self-worth and self-confidence, freeing them to develop a sense of who they are and what they want.  This sense of positive contribution should be evident in all lessons.  It is a focus of our School Development Plan.
  • To have equal educational experiences so that they can make appropriate choices from a base of common skills and knowledge.

However we believe strongly that our children have an equality of opportunity to basic skills in education.  This is fundamental to our provision and allocation of resources.  Specialist teaching, resources and additional support are allocated to specific groups of children or individuals to ensure that they achieve their capacity in basic skills.

Allocation of these resources are managed through the school’s provision mapping, which is routinely reviewed against pupil monitoring, screening, advice from health agencies etc.

We are also committed to ensuring that our provision is positive in supp0orting children’s social and cultural identities.  There is a need to celebrate our identities and discuss and counter prejudices and hidden beliefs.

At St Wilfrid’s;

The development and sharing of common interests will be encouraged.

Children's individual characteristics and feelings need to be respected and valued.

Children are given regular opportunities to explore and discuss this through PSHE lessons, circle times, worry boxes etc.


5.2     RESOURCES AND THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

  • School reviews the suitability of our resources and the learning environment through regular accessibility audits.  These are conducted by the school’s senior’s leadership team with members of the governing body.
  • Books, workcards, equipment and other resources will be checked to see that they are non-stereotyping by all staff.
  • Children will be encouraged to learn to identify and question stereotypes if they are found   in existing material.
  • Resources such as computers, technology equipment and playground space will be allocated fairly to ensure that there is no discrimination in terms of equality of opportunity.
  • Displays will show positive role models.

STAFF TRAINING

Active participation of all school personnel is necessary for a successful policy. Staff meetings will take place as a means of monitoring / evaluating the policy. Also 'raising awareness sessions' will be planned. Training will be applied for all support staff as well.

All the staff have a responsibility for promoting Equal Opportunities.

 

SUCCESS CRITERIA

Equality of Opportunity will be recognised or highlighted in the following areas:

  • Achievement and Attainment of pupils
  • Playground/classroom interaction of children
  • Positive Learning Environment
  • Perceptions of Governors and Parents (through independent surveys)
  • Information on Learning and Teaching
  • Use of resources

6. RACIAL EQUALITY (see also Race Equality policy)

St Wilfrid’s Catholic Primary School staff WILL TACKLE ALL FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION

The main objectives we are working towards are: 

  • to prepare all children to live and work together, with equality of opportunity as part of a multi-racial world
  • to build on the strength of cultural and linguistic diversity
  • to raise awareness and enable children to recognise and challenge inequality
  • to meet effectively the particular educational needs of all children.

IN THE CLASSROOM TEACHERS WILL:

a) raise awareness of similarities and differences of individuals and groups
b) where appropriate encourage positive role models from the community to support work in the classroom and arrange relevant visits to religious buildings
c) have high expectations so all children achieve their full potential, as well as encourage a positive self-image
d) give opportunities for children to express and evaluate their own opinions and to respect the opinions of others
e) at all times encourage children to challenge stereotypes, prejudices and racism
f) carefully choose books and materials and create displays that reflect the diversity within school, community and the wider world
g) audit / monitor their subject ensuring equality issues are addressed
h) be made aware of the ethnic mix, different religions and home language of children
i)  identify children for EAL support
j) as a subject leader, ensure there are appropriate equality links

The School’s Leadership Team will:

  • celebrate the success and achievement of individuals through our positive behaviour policy.
  • ensure all staff, teaching and non-teaching, are informed of the policy
  • provide opportunity children to work with different members of our school community
  • monitor our extended school’s provision activities to ensure that children form all cultural and social groups are encouraged to take part
  • carefully monitor data available to school, to ensure all children achieve their full potential

7. GENDER EQUALITY

IN THE CLASSROOM TEACHERS WILL:

(a) seek to organise the children  to work together in mixed groups so they are less likely to develop antagonistic attitudes, e.g. encouraging them to line up in mixed pairs or by surname, keeping the register in alphabetical order
(b) ensure that areas in the classroom do not become a predominantly male or female domain.

The School’s Leadership Team will ensure that the school:

  • celebrates the success of individuals
  • avoid unnecessary separation of sexes, unless a specific educational purpose is being met
  • ensure staff positions are not limited to one sex
  • ensure all staff, teaching and non-teaching, are informed of the policy
  • provide opportunity for girls and boys to see women and men in a wide variety of roles including work, domestic and recreational
  • ensure that the discipline policy will be the same for both girls and boys
  • make sure extra curricular activities will be available to all children and timetabled to avoid stereotyped classes.

8. DISABILITY EQUALITY

At St Wilfrid’s Catholic Primary school, we have a vast experience of supporting children with a wide range of disabilities.  Our aim is to ensure that no child’s education is limited because of their disability.  This includes the entitlement to participate in residential and outward bound educational activities.

All children are given the opportunity to recognise and respect individual differences and abilities. We are all unique and therefore have the right to be respected and valued for who we are.

We will endeavour to:

  • raise awareness of the varying needs of others and to ensure that we address the needs of all members of our school community.
  • highlight and celebrate the differences between each other
  • raise awareness of the need for appropriate facilities to be available for people with disabilities, e.g. wheel chair ramps.

This will be achieved through:

  • appropriate discussions
  • topic links, e.g. work on the body
  • visiting speakers
    appropriate resources, e.g. positive images in books/stories/displays
Gritting Policy

This policy is part of our overall duty and care under Health and Safety.

POLICY & PROCEDURES

  • It is the responsibility of site staff to grit the car park and pedestrian paths. The Janitor and Site Supervisor will assume responsibility in the light of poor conditions developing

  • All who use the site must take responsibility for following the gritted paths and access routes when icy conditions exist

  • Anyone who discovers a problem during the day in relation to slip[ping due to icy weather must inform the School Office staff who will inform those appropriate

PROCEDURES

  • Sufficient amounts of salt / grit should be on site in anticipation of any adverse weather conditions. It is the responsibility of the caretaker to monitor the use of the grit and to inform the office manager when grit needs to be ordered.
  • Weather forecasts should be monitored for information on deteriorating ice/snow conditions.

  • Salt or grit should be applied to the car park and pedestrian paths for access to the main office reception, and classroom entrance doors when icy conditions exist

  • Signs will be displayed informing pupils, staff, parents and visitors to walk on the gritted areas. (See attached sign)

  • Other areas that require gritting will be identified on a risk basis.

  • Site management staff should wear suitable footwear/gloves for working in icy conditions and inform the School Office if these need to be provided

  • Areas such as steps or slopes that are judged not to be safe even when cleared will be closed and marked accordingly.

  • Where playgrounds remain excessively slippery due to snow or ice, the Headteacher (or deputy head in the absence of the headteacher)will make the decision to accommodate pupils indoors at break times. If playgrounds remain in use, supervision levels will be revised.

  • All reasonable efforts will be made to ensure that the school remains open. However the Head Teacher will have the ultimate decision whether to close the school if the icy conditions are deemed too hazardous.

  • Review alongside Health and Safety Policy

Home-School Agreement

THE SCHOOL MISSION STATEMENT

 

As a Catholic school St Wilfrid’s aims to;-

 

  • Develop in each individual a personal relationship with God which will lead to a living faith.

  • Ensure that the Curriculum is placed with a Catholic Christian setting in which children grow in understanding and in the acquisition of skills, attitudes and values that they may develop to their full potential.

  • Create a positive and fulfilling interaction between all members of the school community, home, parish and local area, to prepare the pupils for entry into the wider community.

  • Look to Christ for the basis of its existence, we aim to show concern for all the teaching staff, together with all non-teaching staff, parents, governors, as well as the pupils.

 

THE STANDARD OF EDUCATION

 

The school aims to;-

  • Ensure that the standard of teaching is satisfactory or better in all lessons.

  • Give children access to a broad and balanced curriculum in keeping with Government and diocesan directives.

  • Match the work set for individual children to their needs wherever possible.

  • Seek specialist teaching help if children have specific learning needs, in close consultation with parents.

  • Resource all curriculum subjects to ensure effective learning.

  • Review, set and publish annually performance targets for national tests (SATs).

 

THE ETHOS OF THE SCHOOL

 

As a Catholic school, we promote the gospel values derived from the teachings and example of Jesus Christ. The aims of our Mission Statement form the underlying principles for all of our school policies. With this in mind we expect all adults and children in the school to adopt the example of Christ as a model for their actions whilst in school. The faith we uphold should underline every relationship, so that all are respected and value as children of God.

 

The school works closely with the churches of the Sacred Heart, Tunstall, St Joseph’s, Burslem and St Bernadette’s, Fegg Hayes particularly in the preparation for the Sacraments. We aim to support and work in close partnership with our parents and our parishes.

 

REGULAR AND PUNCTUAL ATTENDANCE

 

Parents are responsible in law for ensuring that children of compulsory school age receive full-time suitable education. This means attending school punctually, by 9.00am on every day and attending for the whole school day during term time. Only a good reason, such as illness, ever excuses absence.

Parents are responsible for notifying school through a telephone call and a letter if their child is absent. If there is an attendance problem, the school expects parents to work actively with staff and the education welfare service to solve it. Parents do not have the right to take children on holiday in term time. Leave of absence must be granted in advance by the school. Should a request for absence exceed 10 school days, then leave will not normally be granted.

 

BEHAVIOUR MANAGEMENT

 

The school’s aim is to establish an attitude of mutual respect and responsibility within the school community. We see self-discipline as the best discipline and the school operates a positive approach to behaviour management to nurture this. Children are “rewarded” through incentives such as house point stickers, silver and gold stars, teacher awards and Headteacher awards and attendance awards. Successes are celebrated weekly.

Promoting good behaviour and discipline in pupils is a partnership between home and school. Parents have a vital role in fostering good behaviour and parental influence working with school is critical in shaping a child’s attitudes and discipline. Parents and teachers working and supporting each other, together will maintain good behaviour and positive attitudes towards schoolwork. The school’s policies for behaviour management and anti-bullying are detailed documents available in the school foyer for parents to read. Pupils are expected to observe the contents of these documents, which have been discussed at appropriate levels.

 

Part of having a positive attitude means parents taking the responsibility for ensuring their child has the correct school uniform, PE kit and equipment to take a full part in all daily school activities.

 

HOMEWORK

 

Children within the school will receive formal homework dependent on their age. Parents are invited to consult our “Homework Policy” on display in the foyer.

 

Within Early Years and Key Stage 1 this will entail reading daily at home and undertaking simple activities associated with their school work. A home-school reading diary provides a valuable link with home and parents are asked to make a comment about the child as a reader, in this diary.

 

Within Key Stage 2 children will receive homework more frequently as they move through the classes. This may take the form of spellings and tables or other work as the teacher feels appropriate. This includes homework referring to Sacraments. Homework is collected in on the set day, marked and recorded.

 

If a child fails to complete homework regularly, without good reason, then the parent will be invited to discuss the concern with the class teacher in the first instance and then with the Headteacher if the concern is not resolved.

 

Details of homework set for each year group will be communicated to parents by your child’s class teacher. We expect all children to complete their homework and welcome support from home to ensure that the work which has been issued is completed. Irrespective of homework set, reading is still viewed as a daily home activity for all Key Stage 2 children.

 

HOME-SCHOOL INFORMATION

 

The interest and support of parents is welcomed in all aspects of school life. Parents are requested to keep school informed concerning changes to their child’s regular routine. Changes in home circumstances may affect a child more seriously than parents are sometimes aware of. If parents feel that there is a problem they should not hesitate to contact the class teacher or Headteacher as is felt necessary, to discuss the matter at a mutually convenient time. All such issues will be dealt with confidentially.

 

PUPIL’S PROGRESS

 

Each term there is an evening set aside for parents to discuss their child’s progress. These take the form of two Progress and Targets Evenings (Autumn and Summer) and a Progress/ Target Evening where parents have the opportunity to view their child’s work, (Summer.)

The first Progress Evening is usually held in October/ November and is organised by appointment. This is to enable teachers to speak to parents about issues arising from the children settling back into school and new classes.

A further Progress and Target Evening is held in March and again organised by appointment. At this evening parents and guests are invited to tour the entire school, in addition to viewing their own child’s work.

 

A further Progress Evening is held towards the end of the academic year in July. The consultations during this particular evening are normally based on the child’s annual report.

Children in Year 2 and Year 6 will receive the results of their Standards Attainment Tests (SATs) at the end of the Summer Term.

Parents of children with special educational needs will be invited to discuss their child’s progress with the special needs co-ordinator and the class teacher on a more frequent basis.

 

COMMUNICATIONS

 

Dates for the three terms are usually published at the beginning of each term on one of our regular Newsletters. Details for specific events then follow on the weekly newsletter.

 

The school telephone is officially staffed from 8.30am until 4.00pm each day. Parents are welcome to ring should they have an item of information, a query or a concern. Class teachers are usually available before 8.45am and after school to speak informally with parents or at greater length by appointment to avoid disturbing invaluable teaching time and registration. Similarly, the Headteacher is available to speak to parents, although appointments are preferred.

In some circumstances the school may need to contact parents at home or at work.

 

Parents should ensure that their contact details are correct and up to date at all times. Changes should be notified as soon as is practicable.

 

ENTERING AND LEAVING SCHOOL

 

For each child’s safety we would ask parents to notify school, in writing, of any change to a child’s travel arrangements before or after school. This applies particularly to those children travelling by school buses. Parents are respectfully reminded to be considerate when parking around the school premises.

 

THE GOVERNING BODY

 

St Wilfrid’s RC School Governing Body oversees all aspects of the experiences offered to pupils in their care.

They wish to see the aims of the Mission Statement realised in the day to day running of the school. If however, parents feel that the school has not upheld its part of this home-school agreement then they should first contact the class teacher or the Headteacher in a bid to resolve the problem. If after doing this, there is not a satisfactory resolution then a parent may address to the Governing Body. Concerns should be put in writing and addressed to the Chairman of Governors, c/o The School. All concerns will be handled in confidence and with sensitivity and be responded to, in writing, as soon as possible.

Special Educational Needs Policy

AIMS

To enable all children to receive a balanced curriculum whatever their learning need, by the use of appropriate teaching and learning strategies, high expectations and valuing all children as individual learners. This is to offer a fully inclusive education to all children, able bodied or with any disability.

Arrangements for Co-ordinating Educational Provision for Pupils with Special Educational Needs.

  • All children with S.E.N. will be identified and assessed as early as possible on entry into school/nursery by their class teacher and by linking with pre-school agencies prior to entry.

  • The school, in partnership with the parents, will make provision.

  • Where necessary the L.E.A. must make assessments and statements within the statutory time limits review annually.

  • The child’s wishes will be taken into consideration.

  • The school will co-operate closely with all outside agencies.

Special Education Needs Co-ordinator.

The Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator is Mrs C Stuart, who is responsible for:-

  • The day to day running of the school’s S.E.N. policy

  • Liaising and advising class/subject teachers

  • Co-ordinating provision for pupils at School Action, School Action Plus and with a Statement of Special Educational Need

  • Overseeing all records on pupils with S.E.N.

  • Maintaining the school’s S.E.N. register

  • Liaise with parents of children with S.E.N.

  • Liaise with external agencies

  • Contribute to INSET for the whole school

Admission/Inclusion Arrangements

Children with S.E.N. will be admitted into school following the guidelines as stated in the school’s Admissions Policy.

The Special Educational Needs and Disability Right act 2001 and Disability Discrimination Act 2007 amends the Discrimination Act 1995 to prohibit all schools from discriminating against disabled children in their admissions arrangements.

Arrangements for Providing Access for Pupils with S.E.N. to a Balanced Curriculum within the National Curriculum.

  • Children with S.E.N. will be based mainly in the class appropriate to their age with provision made for special help for their needs and will follow a balanced curriculum working towards the level appropriate to their ability.

  • Further support may take place outside of the classroom, working in small groups towards a given specific target objective.

  • The school believes in inclusion for all pupils and demonstrates inclusive practice, providing a common entitlement for all pupils to have access to a common curriculum. It is also mindful of disability discrimination when planning teaching and learning activities.

Identification and Assessment Arrangements

  • A class teacher, who in their professional opinion, considers a child not to be performing at an appropriate level or whose social, emotional, physical development or medical needs is giving cause for concern will begin to collect data on the child concerned . The class teacher will inform parents of the schools concern.

  • If the child is still causing concern the teacher will meet with the S.E.N. co-ordinator. After discussion, and consulting the ‘Criteria and Triggers for Intervention’ document from the L.E.A., if necessary the child will be placed on the S.E.N. register at School Action and the views of the child and parents will be taken.

Stages of Assessment for Pupils with S.E.N.

Class teacher or parents concerned with progress made.

  • Class based differentiated objectives using a range of teaching and learning strategies.

  • Class teacher gathers information on pupils strengths and weakness, including levels of attainment in core subjects, using the early identification sheet.

  • Class teacher discusses pupils needs with parents

After formal discussion with SENCO, the child may be placed at School Action level on the SEN register.

  • The class teacher in consultation with the SENCO formulates an IEP using SMART targets to co-ordinate additional support for the child. Parents are notified by the class teacher of this support and are advised on strategies they themselves may do to help their child at home and are given a copy of the current IEP at each parents evening.

  • Teachers use the child’s IEP to aid planning (see Policy on Quality of Teaching and Learning), and review child’s progress at least once a term, recording outcomes and consulting both child and parents on progress made.

  • Following review of progress, the child may remain at School Action with a new IEP in place, be removed from the register if satisfactory progress allows the child’s needs to be met by differentiation within the classroom, or moved onto School Action Plus after completing a school action review form in conjunction with the Inclusion Team advisory teacher.

If satisfactory progress has not been made the child moves onto School Action Plus.

  • Support agencies become involved in advising the SENCO and class teacher and in supporting the child.

  • IEP is formulated by the SENCO in conjunction with the class teacher.

  • Parental and child’s wishes are taken into account when support is organised.

  • The child’s progress is reviewed at least every six months by SENSS (Special Educational Needs Support Service) and/or the SENCO and class teacher.

  • Involvement of the Educational Psychologist and/or additional agencies and preparation of Psychological reports in cases where on-going referral is required.

Statutory Assessment for a Special Educational Needs statement may be requested by the school in conjunction with the support services, or by parents.

  • The LEA gathers evidence of the child’s need and of provision and strategies used to support the child.

  • The LEA may issue a Statement of Special Educational Support if appropriate.

  • The Statement is reviewed on an annual basis.

Identification of Special Educational Needs

Where a child is considered to have general or global learning difficulties a significant difference ability would be judged on the following criteria, as set out in the ‘Criteria and Triggers for Intervention’ document:

  • At the end of KS1 the child is working towards Level 1 in literacy and/or numeracy and so scores as a W.

  • At the end of KS2 the child is working towards Level 2 in literacy and/or numeracy and scores level 1.

  • The child has difficulty in managing their own behaviour even when the schools discipline policy has been positively implemented. Their behaviour is seen to be having detrimental influence on their own and others academic progress. There are a range of behaviour support services throughout the authority that can be accessed through the educational psychologist or school doctor/nurse.

  • In identifying and assessing children from ethnic minority backgrounds, where English is a second language, the school will ensure that care will be taken to consider the child within the context of his/her home, language and culture. If necessary, help will be sought, from the TALEEM staff and bilingual support staff, interpreting information for the parents and the children.

  • We also include children with sensory difficulties, which impact on educational progress being made.

  • SENSS have a range of specialist teachers to include HI, VI, SPLD, speech language and communication, ASD and PB.

School Access Facilities

The school is equipped to accommodate wheel chair bound pupils, due to the availability of a disabled toilet and ramps into the school building, which is on one level. As part of the Disability Policy, school will always endeavour to make reasonable adjustments to support all children and adults with additional needs in accessing the school facilities and curriculum.

(See school accessibility plan).

Allocation of Resources

The SENCO receives capitation to purchase additional resources to support pupils with S.E.N. Occasionally, resources may be loaned to school from outside agencies to meet a child’s needs, to enable them to access the curriculum successfully.

Support Services

The support services including SENSS, Educational Psychologist, Parent Partnership and Social Services aim to support the development of effective partnership between families, schools and the LEA to the benefit of children with SEN.

The Special Educational Needs Support Service

SENSS assists the SENCO and staff to identify and support pupils who have significantly greater difficulties in learning than their peers, and so are at the School Action Plus stage. They work in partnership with teachers, parents and pupils. Individual contact or involvement requires parental consent.

The advisory teacher can be contacted on 01782 232538.

SENSS may be contacted at ‘The Mount’

Telephone 01782 232538.

Educational Psychology Service

The Educational Psychologist makes an assessment of individual children, planning, monitoring and evaluating intervention programs. The Headteacher and SENCO may contact the service through regular school visits. New and intermediate concerns can be raised during visits or by telephone. Individual contact or involvement with children requires parental consent.

The Educational Psychology service may be contacted at ‘The Mount’

Telephone 01782 234700.

School Health Service

The School Nurse will be called in to check children’s hearing and sight where these are causing concern, in order to eliminate physical problems as being a cause of SEN. Where necessary the school doctor and or speech and language therapists may also be contacted through Burslem Health Centre.

As part of a cluster of schools in the area, St. Peter’s has regular input with a Speech Therapist once a fortnight for children up to year 2. A referral may be made once permission from parents has been sought by the class teacher.

Parent Partnership

Any parent whose child has SEN can be supported through Parent Partnership. This may be achieved through individual or group support meetings.

Telephone 01782 234701

Governing Body

It is the role of the governing body to ensure that the necessary provision is made for any pupils who has special educational needs. For the Governor responsible for SEN please contact the school.

School & Parent Partnership

We are committed to working with parents on partnership. We will always abide with our statutory duty to inform parents and seek their permission if we think their child has special educational needs. This will be done initially by the class teacher as described. The SENCO is available for discussion by appointment to discuss a child’s needs further.

  • If as a parents you are concerned about your child you will be encouraged to talk to the class teacher in the first instance. If you are still concerned the SENCO or the headteacher.

  • Parents will be encouraged to make a note of their worries and/or bring a friend or relative for support

  • If a parent is still not happy they should complain to the school governing body/parent partnership or finally the Secretary of State for Education.

Currently our school receives an entitlement to support from the above services which at present is free on the point of delivery. This support is devised annually on service level agreements.

Links With Other Schools

Any records belonging to a child moves to the child’s new school. Year 6 transitions to their high school may involve discussion meetings with the school’s SENCO to enable continued support where necessary.

Sun Protection Policy

 

St. Wilfrid’s

Sun Protection Policy

Rationale

Too much exposure to ultraviolet light (UV) radiation from the sun causes sunburn, skin damage and increases the risk of skin cancer. Sun exposure in the first 15 years of life contributes significantly to the lifetime risk of skin cancer. There is enormous potential for schools to prevent skin cancer in future generations. Schools are central to protecting children’s skin.

This is because:

·         Children are at school five out of seven days a week at times when UV rays are high

·         Most damage due to sun exposure occurs during school years

·         Schools can play a significant role in changing behaviours through role

modelling and education

·         Students and teachers are at risk of sunburn within 10-15 minutes of being exposed to strong sunlight

·         Students spend an average of 1.5 hours outside per day, more if involved in sports or outdoor activities.

·         Skin cancer is largely preventable through behaviour modification and sun

protection during early years

 

At  St. Wilfrid’s Catholic Academywe want staff and pupils to enjoy the sun safely. We will work with staff, pupils and parents to achieve this by raising pupil and parent awareness.

 

Implementation

We will achieve this by implementing these measures-

 

Curriculum

·         All pupils will have at least 1 SunSmart lesson per year.

·         We will talk about how to be SunSmart in assemblies at the start of the

          Summer term.

·         Parents and guardians will be sent a letter, explaining what the school is

         doing about sun protection and how they can help, at the beginning of the

         Summer term

 

Protection

·         Shade - children will be encouraged to sit in the shade in the playground and field.

·         The availability of shade is considered when planning excursions and all

          outdoor activities

Clothing

·         Children should bring sun hats (clearly named) to school to wear at playtimes and during outdoor PE lessons in the summer term.

·         Children may only wear prescription sunglasses or sunglasses if they have been diagnosed with hay fever by a doctor. Sunglasses to be worn outdoors only on bright days

 

Sun Screen

·         Sun screen use will be required on school trips and for outdoor PE lessons.

·         We will send letters home asking for permission for adults to apply sun screen to children during the summer months.

·         Children are expected to bring their own sun screen at least SPF 30+, all sun screen should be named clearly.

·         Children may only use their own sun screen.

·         Teachers will apply sun screen to children.

 

Keeping Hydrated

  • Children will also be encouraged to drink lots of water to continually              re-hydrate themselves. Sports cap water bottles brought in from home are kept in the classrooms.
  • Nursery and Reception have jugs of water and cups.
  • At lunchtimes all children will be encouraged to drink water or juice with their lunch.
  • At lunchtimes children will be advised to play a mixture of quiet sitting down games as well as active running around games.

 

Role modelling

Encourage staff to act as role models by:

  • Wearing protective hats, clothing and sunglasses when outside
  • Apply SPF 30+ sunscreen
  • Seek shade whenever possible

 

Collaboration

The school will aim to work with parents, Governors and the wider community to

reinforce awareness about sun safety and promote a healthy school.

This policy has been developed using the Cancer Research UK SunSmart Guidelines for Primary Schools.

 

Annually review

 

 

Reviewed: ……………………………………..  Signed: …………………………………………………………………….

Use of Mobile Phones

Introduction

In line with the recent protocol issued by the City Council with regards to the use of mobile phones by school managed employees and centrally managed teachers the Governing Body adopted this policy on 2 July 2007.

This policy has been developed using the protocol issued by the City Council which has been drafted in consultation with the Authority’s Trade Union Representatives. It is intended to give staff some broad guidelines regarding the use and possible misuse of mobile phones.

Use of Mobile Phones During the Working Day

The use of mobile phones during the school day is considered inappropriate for the following reasons;

  • It does not set a professional and positive example to pupils.

  • It is a nuisance/discourteous to pupils/colleagues e.g. during lessons/meetings).

  • It is a misuse of the school/authorities time.

The Governing Body request that all staff;

  • Switch off mobile phones at all times unless on lunch or dinner break and not supervising pupils or other staff

  • Do not at any time take photographs of pupils via the mobile phone

In the case of an emergency special permission should be sought from the employee line manager who will consider the request.

Text Messages

Text messages are not appropriate as a means of communicating with colleagues within a school/workplace setting.

The following are regarded as unacceptable;

  • Notifying a Manager/Headteacher of sickness absence (this should always be by direct personal telephone contact, in accordance with the contract of employment and agreed school procedures).

  • Informing of changes to working arrangements.

  • Issuing disciplinary warnings.

  • Giving instructions.

Protection of Employees – Health & Safety Considerations

  • It is not appropriate for employees to disclose their personal telephone numbers to pupils. This has the potential to compromise their professional standing. (Employees should never seek to establish social contact with pupils for the purpose of securing friendship or to pursue or strengthen a relationship. Employees should realise that such contact could be lead to allegations of unacceptable behaviour). It is for the Teacher to set the boundaries of the Teacher Student relationship.

  • Employees should be discouraged from making their personal telephone numbers available to parents.

  • Governors should particularly consider their duty of care to protect the Head’s work-life balance where the Headteacher proposes making his/her private numbers available to parents.

  • Employees should respect the work/life balance of colleagues and should not send work-related text messages to colleagues out of school hours.

  • In circumstances where employees are lone-working in remote areas of the school, or out of hours, a work mobile or two-way radio should be provided if there is no land-line in the room (ref. Local Authority Lone Working Policy).

  • Employees should never use mobile phones whilst driving. An employee who uses their mobile phone whilst driving on work-related business will be subject to disciplinary action.

Mobile Phones & Pupils

Pupils are not allowed to bring a mobile phone to school. If staff observed that a child has a mobile phone in school the following should take place;

  • The phone will be kept in the school office until the end of the school day

  • Parents will be notified by phone or letter to remind them that mobile phones are not allowed in school

  • Phones to be locked away – parents need to come in to school and sign for it.

An increasing number of mobile phones now have built-in cameras and have the capability to capture copy and transmit images through a range of technologies and formats; employees should exercise vigilance if there is concern that images are being taken as this is a breach of an individuals ‘right to privacy’ if permission has not first been granted.

Employees should be aware that there have been rare occasions where employees have been deliberately provoked to anger by pupils for the purpose of recording their reaction.

If an employee receives material he/she considers to be inappropriate, the images/text messages should be retained as evidence and referred immediately to the Headteacher.

Where it is believed that the images may be of child pornography or breach the Safeguarding Children Policy the Headteacher must immediately notify the Police without viewing the images. Important note – the viewing/forwarding of such images could constitute a criminal offence and could lead to arrest and prosecution.

 

Reviewed & Approved by Governors –

May 2012 Review in line with City Policy